The Importance Of Women's Rights Movement

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For centuries women where cursed, beaten, and neglected just because they wanted a voice in American society. There was a time before when women were not treated equally in comparison to men. A woman 's sole purpose of living was to cook, clean, and take care of her children. Women had no right in deciding who they wanted to be and they surely had no voice in government or politics of American society. Starting in the mid nineteenth century, women began protested to show how passionate they were to vote and be in control. Today women have equal rights as men when it comes to voting because of the suffragist who fought long and hard to gain equal voting rights. The social movement led by angered women tested the cultural perceptions in the past …show more content…
The fight for the right to vote began around this time, but did not end until 1920, that is approximately 70 years of fighting for a cause. A reason for so little support could be blamed on the lack of publicity at the time. Also, women did not have a voice because the household was ran by the male figure. When women talked, no one listened and this made it hard to get a point across to both men and …show more content…
Men did not support women for speaking out and would use violent language towards the women. In 1912 a suffrage parade was organized to take place in New York City by a young Quaker named Alice Paul and her friend Lucy Burns (National Women 's History Museum). During the parade women marched peacefully through the roads holding banners and riding on floats to spread the word about suffrage, but the crowd’s reaction was not what they had hoped for. Twenty thousand suffragist and supporters marched in the parade (National Women 's History Museum). Women who were in the crowd watching the parade were in shock when men broke through the barriers and beat the women in the street for marching for the right to vote, this made women even more fearful to stand up for their rights. The parade gained a lot of media coverage, which was well needed, and resulted in the women 's suffrage movement to be heard in homes across the nation. Media coverage then still consisted of newspapers. Newsboys would walk around selling papers like you would see in an old movie clip, this was how you had to gain publicity in the early 1900’s. Alice Paul and Lucy Burns continued to work for the right to vote. Together they founded and organized the National Women’s Party, also known at the NWP, in 1916 (National Women 's History Museum). Together these two young girls lead a variety of women to fight for voting rights. Alice and Lucy borrowed

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