The Impact Of Women's Rights Movement

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After the cotton gin was produced by Eli Whitney in 1793, cotton became the most produced material in the 1800’s. This created a higher need for slaves in the South and in 1820-1830 slave revolts, strikes and protest were at an all-time high. During the antebellum years in the northern United States, women’s rights movements were being born and a massive world-historic movement for social change was underway. The radical struggle to end slavery was just the beginning of the life long fight to end women’s suffrage. The many women that lead these powerful movements will forever be remembered in the fight against slavery and for women’s rights, but they would face many challenges and set-backs along the way during and after the Second Great Awakening …show more content…
Anti –slavery activist had intensified their fight during this time, wanting to perfect society, they saw slavery as evil and that it destroyed their free will as human beings. As a result of this, William Lloyd Garrison and Quaker Lucretia Mott along with several others, created the American Anti-Slavery Society. These abolitionist demanded uncompensated emancipation of slaves during 1833. Lucretia Mott was a very influential Female leader and Mott not only helped in creating the AASS, but she also helped in the founding of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society in 1833 and along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, they would create The Women’s Rights Movement. This organization included African Americans and white female leaders fighting for racial and gender equality. These organizations would fight to create the end to not only slavery, but racism, discrimination, and women’s suffrage throughout the Antebellum

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