A Comparison Of The Lord Of The Flies And The Lord Of The Flies

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Hearing the name J.R.R. Tolkien strikes a chord within nearly everybody. He was the infamous writer, author of the Hobbit, and later in his life The Lord of The Rings. Tolkien also battled alongside many other soldiers in World War I, which begs the question if his works are related to the war or if they are merely an escape from the horrors of war. William Golding, another famed author, fought similarly in World War II and his first work, The Lord of the Flies was based around the fact. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings is more of an escapist form of literature, but the trilogy also relates to some horrors of war time and contains themes similar to war time authors such as William Golding. Both Tolkien and Golding’s work encompasses elements …show more content…
Growing up he bullied other children and later in his life he would even go as far to admit that he enjoyed hurting people. During his time in the Royal Navy in World War II, Golding learned just how destructive people were capable of being. Lord of the Flies in short is about a bunch of British schoolboys from varying ages of six to twelve who are wrecked on a deserted island. Initially the children remain with societal order and elect a leader, Ralph, to guide them. To keep the peace, the children decide to give power to whoever holds the conch; the conch holder was given the right to speak. Simply, the kids attempt to build a fire to signal that they were abandoned on the island. An older boy, Jack from the beginning was a bully, picking on a chubby, sensible kid nicknamed Piggy. Gradually peace and structure declines as Jack branches away and starts his own tribe of savages. The boys in Jack’s tribe participate in violent pig hunts which eventually turn even more inhumane when they brutally murder one boy, Simon. Eventually, they kill Piggy, and start a man hunt for Ralph. Before the manhunt can come to a close, a smoke signal alerts someone and a Navy officer appears on the island. The officer questions Ralph before rallying the rest of the children. Golding’s novel ends with Ralph and the remaining children grieving the loss of their deceased friends, and the inner demons within human …show more content…
The companions are not obliged to stay, but in both Lord of the Flies and the Lord of the Rings love or the loyalty of friendship keeps Sam, and Piggy devoted to serving alongside their designated hero. Samwise Gamgee, one of the most fainthearted hobbits to ever live in the Shire follows Frodo all the way to Mordor. Despite Frodo warning him of the dangers, Sam responds with, “I know that well enough, Mr. Frodo. Of course you are. And I 'm coming with you”. More than just mere loyalty and the obligation of going since Gandalf caught him eavesdropping in driving Sam to stay with Frodo; Sam evidently cares for the wellbeing of his friend and loves him enough to know that he wouldn’t want his friend to take on the perilous journey alone. Likewise Piggy stands by Ralph even when the other children doubt him or side with

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