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20 Cards in this Set

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What is the first step in planning the defense?

Set the goal in your mind!

What is the primary goal in defensive play?
To set the contract.
What are owed tricks?
Owed tricks are tricks the contract implies we should be able to take.
How do we determine the tricks we are owed?

The rule of 13


or


The rule of 7

What is the rule of 13?

Subtract the number of tricks contracted for (x) from the total number of tricks possible (13), equals the number of tricks we are owed (y).


13 - x = y


ex: Contract is 4H = Declarer needs to take 10 tricks.


13-10=3, we are owed 3 tricks.





What is the rule of 7?

Subtract the actual contract (x) from the maximum contract possible (7), equals the number of tricks we are owed (y).7 - x = y


ex: Contract is 4S


7-4=3, we are owed 3 tricks.

How do you determine how many tricks the defense needs to set a contract?

We can add 1 to our owed tricks (x) , equals the number of tricks needed to set a contract (y).


x + 1 = y


ex: Contract is 3N


Rule of 7: 7-3=4, we are owed 4 tricks;


4+1=5, we need to take 5 tricks to set the contract.

Regarding setting defensive tricks, what is the rule of 8?

Subtracting the contract (x) from 8, equals the number of tricks the defense needs to take to set a contract (y).


8 - x = y


ex: Contract is 5D


8-5=3, we need to take 3 tricks to set the contract.

What is Guestimating?
Guestimating is the process of estimating strength, HCP and potential tricks to come up with an intelligent guess in creating a plan of defense.
How do you estimate your partner's HCP?

40HCP - Opponents estimated HCP(x) - My HCP(y) = Partner's estimated HCP(z)


40-x-y=z

Vs. Suits: Every ____HCP in partner's hand equals a potential defensive trick.
4.5
Vs. Notrump: Every ____HCP in partner's hand equals a potential defensive trick.
3.5
How do we estimate the number of tricks we deserve according to our estimated HCP holding?

Add your expected defensive tricks (x) to the fuzzy expectation of partner's potential defensive tricks (y) to determine the number of tricks we deserve according to your estimated HCP (z).


x+y=z


ex: I can see 2 potential defensive tricks in my hand and I estimated my partner has 8 HCP which fuzzily equates to 2 defensive tricks versus a 3 notrump contract, so: 2+2= 4 tricks we deserve.

How do we determine the number of tricks we need to develop?

Subtract the number of tricks we deserve (y) from number of tricks we need to set them (x), equals the number of tricks we need to develop (z).


x-y=z


We deserve 3 (y) tricks in a 4 spade contract. We need to take 4 tricks to set them.


4-3=1, we need to develop 1 trick.



What are the two primary defensive strategies?
Passive and Aggressive
What is the difference between passive and aggressive defensive strategies?
Urgency and potential risk
Passive defense is...?
When it isn't urgent to get our tricks right away, we don't need to make risky plays.
Aggressive defense is...?

When it is urgent to get our tricks ASAP, we are willing to take risks.

What sort of defense do Sharks prefer?
All things being equal and with little information to know otherwise, Sharks prefer passive defense.
When should we be aggressive?
  1. Game contracts where we know the opponents have a good side suit. Active, but not attacking, defense is called for.
  2. When responder makes a preemptive raise. Attack!
  3. When the auction started with a notrump bid but settled in a suit contract. Attack!
  4. When the opponents have bid a small slam in a suit contract. Active, but not attacking.
  5. After a transfer sequence and they declare in notrump, if you can tell dummy's suit lies well for declarer, lead aggressively.
  6. When they open 1 notrump and it gets passed out, make active leads.