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15 Cards in this Set

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What organ system are hormones a part of?

Endocrine System.

Which hormones are on the posterior pituitary?

1)Oxytocin and


2)ADH (antidiuretic) also called vasopressin

Which hormones are on the anterior pituitary?

FSH: Follicle Stimulating Hormone


LH: Leutinizing Hormone


ACTH: Adrenocorticotropic Releasing Hormone


TSH: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone


PRL: Prolactin


GH: Growth Hormone

For TSH, list the following:


1. Location


2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor


3. Target Organ (s)


4. Product or Action


5. Disease



1. Anterior pituitary

2. TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone)


3. Thyroid gland


4.Release of thyroid hormones (T3 & T4)


5. Too high = hyperthyroidism (Grave's disease) Too low =hypothyrodism (or cretinism in children)

For Oxytocin, list the following:



1. Location




2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor




3. Target Organ (s)




4. Product or Action




5. Disease

1. Posterior pituitary




2. None. Stimulated or inhibited by appropriate neural stimuli




3. Uterus, breasts




4. Labor (contractions and labor) and Lactation (initiates ejection of milk)




5. Unknown

For LH, list the following:



1. Location




2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor




3. Target Organ (s)




4. Product or Action




5. Disease

1. Anterior pituitary




2. GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone)




3. Ovaries and testes




4. Ovulation and Testosterone




5. Low = No sexual maturation; High = nothing important

For GH, list the following:



1. Location


2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor


3. Target Organ (s)


4. Product or Action


5. Disease

1. Anterior pituitary




2. GHRH (Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone)




3. Liver, muscle, bone, cartilage, and other tissues.




4. Stimulates growth and increases -->Glucose, FFA (free fatty acids), IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor 1)




5. Low = Dwarfism (children); High = Gigantisim (children) and acromegaly (adults)

For ADH or Vasopressin, list the following:


1. Location


2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor


3. Target Organ (s)


4. Product or Action5. Disease

1. Posterior pituitary




2. Impulses from hypothalamic neurons due to increase in blood solute concentration. Also can be increase by pain, drugs and low BP.




3. Kidneys




4. Stimulates kidneys to reabsorb of water




5. Low = Diabetes insipidus and increased thirst; High = Syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH)

For FSH, list the following:




1. Location




2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor




3. Target Organ (s)




4. Product or Action




5. Disease

1. Anterior pituitary




2. GnRH (Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone)




3. Ovaries and Testes




4. Ovulation and estrogen (females) and Spermatogenesis (males)




5. Low = Failure of sexual maturation; High = Nothing important

For Andrenocorticotropic Releasing Hormone (ACTH) , list the following:


1. Location


2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor


3. Target Organ (s)


4. Product or Action


5. Disease

1. Anterior pituitary


2. CRH (corticotropin releasing hormone)


3. Adrenal cortex


4. Aldosterone, cortisol, estrogens and testoterone


5. High = too much corticosteroids as implicated in Cushing's syndrome.

For Prolactin (PRL) , list the following:


1. Location


2. Hypothalamic hormone stimulus/inhibitor


3. Target Organ (s)


4. Product or Action


5. Disease

1. Anterior pituitary




2. Dopamine per this text, but others still say PIF or PIH. Major mode of regulation however is tonic inhibition.




3. Breasts




4. Promotes lactation




5. Low = Poor milk production in nursing women; High = Inappropriate milk production (galactorrhea)

Define the role of vasopressin osmoreceptors and baroreptors

These receptors regulate the release of vasopressin (ADH) from the posterior pituitary gland.













What is the function of osmoreceptors? List limits. Relationship to plasma osmolality?

Function: Very sensitive marker to extremely small changes plasma osmolality




Threshold at < 284 mOsm/kg to release ADH




Direct relation to plasma osmolality. As plasma osmolality increases, vasopressin increases. (Decreased urine until patient returns to homeostasis)

What is the function of baroreptors? List limits. Reaction qualities?

Function: Initiates vasopressin release in response to a fall in blood volume or blood pressure (Located in left atrium, aortic arch, and carotid arteries)



Threshold at 5-10% drop in arterial pressure to release ADH




Exponential response which can override normal osmotic suppression of vasopressin secretion.





What is pitocin?

A synthetic form of oxytocin used to induce labor.