Women's Rights Movement

Improved Essays
For hundreds of years, women were seen to be inferior to men. Men and women had different obligations and rights at first. Women’s roles were solely focused on household area, and they were prohibited from voting, having a job, getting education, and much more. Women nowadays have different roles and responsibilities due to the changes that happened in the last hundred years. Since the globalization era and women’s rights movements, females and most males stood up to defend women’s rights and their equality to men. Although many things have changed corresponding to women roles and duties, there is still a significant amount of things that are still the same. Women’s roles in politics, education, and in work changed significantly in the past …show more content…
Politics, in the past, were not considered as a woman’s business. In most societies of the world, politics have always been predominantly a masculine profession. Modern global conversations around women’s rights and political participation have been taking place for almost a hundred years. Women’s rights movements adopted a point, which was the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women. After many conferences, declarations, and actions women were given the right to play an equal role in politics as men. At first, women were deprived of their least political right, which is to vote. The foremost reason why women were not allowed to vote was because politicians saw that females were too emotional and could not make rational choices. Now, after women’s rights movements, females gained the right to vote as any other male citizen did. On the other hand, women were also given the right to participate in political activities after centuries of banning them. In the present political world, we can see many women as political party leaders. For an instance, Leyla Zana was the first Kurdish female politician, who founded the Democracy Party in the Kurdish parliament (Jalil and Katman, 2010). Females nowadays also have the right to run for presidency. For example, President Ellen Johnson Serleaf is the first female president of Liberia, and the first elected female head of state …show more content…
At first, girls’ education was oriented towards domestic life. Females learned how to cook, to spin, to sew, to go with the animals to the grassland, to take care of the house, and to obey family rules. Even the amount of schools for girls was very low compared to that of boys (Mihaila, 2012). Globalization and the feminist movement promoted the importance of issues related to female education. After many years of claiming equality between the two genders, new female institutions were founded. Females were then allowed to get a better and higher level of education. As years passed, more schools and colleges began accepting girls. The ratio of educated girls with respect to that of boys began to rise. Nowadays both genders can get the same level of high education. A statistical survey shows that the percentage of females enrolling to collages have increased rapidly in the past years from 10% to about 63% (Mihaila, 2012). After all, we can say that the level of education females are getting now has improved a lot after globalization, and the feminist movements, and that has also transpired in the work

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