The Awakening Women's Freedom Analysis

Superior Essays
The Awakening: Women’s Freedom Women’s independence is a big achievement. Kate Chopin in her novel The Awakening shows the power a woman takes to change herself and society around her. Through the novel, the character evolves mentally and physically for her freedom goal. Kate chopin forms a character who goes stubbornly against the society rules. In The Awakening, Kate Chopin argues that women can live independently without marriage and women have to make their own life choices; she developed this argument by using plot, setting, character, and symbolism.
Kate Chopin uses her plot for clarification of events that are happening for easy readers’ appeal. The story begins on a summer day at the Grand Isle where Edna Pontellier is having a vacation
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The story The Awakening was written in the late 1800s, during the time when men controlled everyone at the work and at the family. Leonce Pontellier most of the time spends in his business. He is always leaves his wife Edna Pontelllier and two of his children for business trips. Before the trips Leonce gives Adna’s order of how to behave herself while his leave. During his bussines trips he tries to control his family and his wife by the writtng of the letters. The first part of the story takes place during the summer time on Grand Isle. That is the pace of happy and relaxed life …show more content…
As in much romantic art, however, the sea serves here a double purpose for the individual: …It can turn soul’s attention outward to the infinity suggested by endless expanse of encircling horizon and sky –to comfort the universe alone. (583)
She saw purity and no barrier at the see. Ednafelt her soul will find peace and end her life at the see.
Kate Chopin effectively describes how social pressure on women’s independence leaves no choice of finding it through the commitment of the suicide.
Edna first thinks of her husband and children, defiantly asserting, “They need no have thought that they could posses her, body and soul” (Chopin 137). Next images her mentor, Mademoiselle Reisz, criticizing her in these final moments of weakness…. hoping Doctor Mandelet would have understood her. (McConnell 43)
Kate Chopin shows that her character did not have any choice to be free since marriage was the cage for women. Therefore, the author showed how big role the society places at decision-making and how it manipulates on people

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