Why Men Need Women's Suffrage Analysis

Amazing Essays
“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence” Helen Keller, author, humanitarian, and lecturer once said. Many Americans may be unaware on the true impact she left on the women’s rights movement. Keller pursued life as an avid activist promoting, humanitarian beliefs, education, and women’s suffrage. Keller published an essay, “Why Men Need Woman Suffrage” in 1913. She targets men as her main audience hoping to broaden their minds to realize the importance women have in society. Tying back to the meaning of the first quote, without optimism or faith no progress can ever be achieved. Therefore, the History 51 class goes in-depth on this “optimism and faith” all women had to accomplish to fight …show more content…
After being heavily involved with the war by providing aid by being nurses and cooks, many women demanded more representation within society. The suffrage movement was finally won on August 18th 1920, creating a major step for women’s equality. Also, starting in the 1920s, groups of women called Flappers were popping up in major cities. These women were described as, “brash for wearing excessive makeup, drinking, treating sex in a casual manner, smoking, driving automobiles, and otherwise flouting social and sexual norms” (wiki). Young women rebelled against conservative norms by dressing in clothing that publicly expressed their sexuality. Society, “thought flappers were risky and inappropriate but they gave the world our modern-day style”3. This turning point in history prompted future women’s equality movements. More women were intrigued by the sense of individualism and new freedom. The true fight for birth control and abortion rights started in the 1960s and eventually legalized in 1973 as the result of the Roe v Wade case. 1964 proved to be a big year by, “Title VII prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin”9 . This allowed women to have equal opportunities attaining jobs without discrimination based on sex. Established in 1966, the National Organization for Women (NOW), continues to contribute to society today. “NOW seeks to end sexual discrimination, especially in the workplace, by means of legislative lobbying, litigation, and public demonstrations.4” Today, the organization consists of 550 chapters in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. The growth of this organization contributes progress in women’s rights. Young girls realize the inequality that persists in society and begin to find ways to fight against

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Anna Shaw's Speech

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Rhetorical Analysis of “The Fundamental Principle of a Republic” The women’s suffrage movement was one of the most well-established movements recorded in U.S. History. Many women were institutionalized because they wanted a right every American citizen should be able to acquire. On June 15, 1915, American citizen Anna Shaw delivered a speech to challenge the political platform of injustice. Shaw indicates in this speech that women could do much more than cook, clean, and bear children. In “The Fundamental Principle of a Republic,” Shaw effectively incorporates the rhetorical principles of logos, anecdote, and procatalepsis to indomitably persuade her audience to support the women’s suffrage movement.…

    • 1055 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Women's Movement

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Betty Friedan also played a vital role in founding the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966, which is one of the biggest feminist organizations. She remained the president of this influential organization for almost 5 years. Now tackled issues such as; women abuse, economic injustice and fought for the right of abortions. It aimed to end all forms of discrimination against women, including political…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This woman's rights activist created the National Woman Suffrage Association, used Persisting and Striving for Accuracy to innovate ways to overcome a world without gender equality, and illuminated the world by helping give it a woman suffrage amendment. Susan Brownell Anthony created many extraordinary things in her lifespan and she was most famous for helping organize the woman suffrage movement (Sochen, 2015). Her family were Quakers - people who believed in the equality of men…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Many people misconceived these women’s feelings toward the contestants in the pageant. They weren’t protesting to those women, they were speaking out to those who promote the contest and the standards that it creates. These women were brave, and paved the way for the rights that women have today. Grasping the gravity of this movement, the stigmas it ignored, and the courage of a group of women to make a change will help deteriorate societal standards and the gender stereotypes that live within them. “The feminist protest at the Miss America Pageant in 1968 was, in many ways, the public beginning of the second wave of feminism, and its importance for our understanding of dominant media’s relationship to women’s liberation goes beyond the specificity of the bra burning myth.…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women's Rights in the 1920’s and the history of the tremendous fight for equality The roaring twenties was a loud time for probation, gangs, jazz, but the the women’s rights movement roared louder. While researching the women’s rights I learned about the influential women who fought for equality and defined what it meant to be a woman in a free world. In this paper I have organized my topic in 5 categories. The first being the history of Women’s suffrage and then the rights and restrictions of women in the 1920s. Page three begins the discussion of the fight for full equality and the framers of the equal rights amendment.…

    • 1773 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Alice Paul Essay

    • 780 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Paul was a middle class woman. She had escaped the social norms of women by becoming a suffragist by fighting for her beliefs. By leading the marches and rallies, there was an increase in her social standing because of the supporters she got while doing so. When the 19th Amendment was ratified, her social standing rose once again because she was able to accomplish her goal and change the lives of all women in the United States. As time progressed, women looked at her as a powerful woman in that she had changed the perspective of others of the impact that one person can have on society.…

    • 780 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The function of women in America has been ever-changing and progressive since the established institution of republican motherhood of the colonial period. Throughout history, many women have attempted to oppose the meek, and maternal cutout that was made for them by patriarchal societies. The fight for women’s rights has been long and strenuous with many victories along the way, leading up to the ultimate campaign for gender equality during the 1960s lead by influential, empowering women. One of the earliest and most significant of the feminist victories was the ratification of the nineteenth amendment in 1920 which granted women the right to vote. Women continued to push barriers by challenging the republican motherhood ideal that a women’s…

    • 1760 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Between 1869 and 1906, she stood in front of every congress, but they all had the same reaction. During all this, she also began to campaign for women’s property rights in New York State. In 1860, the New York State Married Women’s Property Bill became a law; this allowed married women to own property, keep their own wages, and have custody of their children. In 1875, she struck something known as “social evil.” It’s also formerly known as prostitution, she attacked it in a speech in Chicago. She called for equality in marriage, workplace, and the ballot box to eliminate the need for women to go out on the streets.…

    • 1139 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    During this time of the movement, women became very creative in the way the fought for their right to vote. They used any avenue they could. In 1916, on Valentine’s Day, women made “Valentine” cards for all of the congressmen. These cards actually pushed the passing of the 19th amendment. The women left these cards in the desks on the congressmen so that when they arrived to work, they received them.…

    • 1452 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Together they worked to end slavery and named it the abolitionist movement. An article mentions that at the age of 17, she was collecting anti-slavery petitions. As she grew older she felt inspired and knew she had to do something about women not having any rights. Anthony affected society in a positive way she made it possible for women to be included in the development of our nation. She began giving speeches around the country to convince others to support a woman’s right to vote.…

    • 434 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays