Have Women Caught Up To Men Essay

Decent Essays
Have Women Caught Up to Men?
Women have been on neglected for thousands of years, waiting for the time to get equal rights. Women have always been supporting men in the background; Whether taking care of children or helping in war effort. However, women have not gotten the deserved recognition for their effort. During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century women finally began to try and open opportunities for women with a focus on suffrage. The movements were quite impactful and truly changed how women were treated and what rights they could have, especially in the United States. These movements allowed the doors of feminism and equality to open, but the necessity of the Second Women’s Rights Movement is when it truly kick
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Women were not permitted to have claim over land, divorce was not allowed unless for a great cause, but most importantly only women’s husbands have claim over money even if the money is provided by the wife’s family. The First Movement did not largely affect these concerns, it only addressed that there was a problem that needed to be focused on whereas the Second Movement had broadened their horizons and look upon every single issue. In 1960s women 's roles were seen to be staying at home, watching over children and doing all of the housework. Women were meant to depend on the husband 's salary. Yet, the Second Movement opposed these ideas. the women who ran the organizations wanted women to step out of the house and become engaged in the labour force. The labour force participation statistics have demonstrated the evolution of women participating in the labour force from before the Second Movement began to 2014. In 1950 the percentage was 33.9 percent which compared to 2014’s data where 57 percent of women are in the labour force. Also, it showed how the Second Movement has increased the participation made by women, the percentage of women in the labour force is 46.8 percent in 2015. (Status of Women Data, n.d.). The Second Movement has initiated the women’s desire to participate in the workplace, without it the women of today would be struggling to get into the men-dominated society to recognize women are …show more content…
However, today women are perceived with many types of roles. During the Second Movement, women began to wish that society viewed them as people who can have their own identity. In 1960s women took on the role of being the homemaker. Women were told for decades that they need to stay home and be at beck and call for their husbands and children. Since, the Second Movement women have recognized that they can be in the workforce and accommodate the demands of a family. In 1965, the average amount of hours for paid work was 8.4 hours whereas in 2011 the average was 21.4 hours. The amount of time given to child care has not increase much but the 3.3 percent increase. (Pew Research Center, n.d.) This implies that women have found a balance between careers and family. The increase shows that the women did not need to stay home like they have always been but, they can work on a successful career without neglecting their family. The Second Movement encourage the dismissal of women being the homemaker, it supported the idea of a working mother. Women are not financially dependent on their spouses today in contrast to before 1970s. The husband was meant to be the breadwinner for the family but there was a change once the Second movement began. Once women found their own independence, the idea of being a homemaker was not accepted. In the past few decades, women have founded a new independence in financial needs,

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