The Importance Of Music Education In Music Schools

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It’s a chilly, fall night. The fans cheer as the football team rushes out and the cheerleaders do their stunts. It’s the beginning of first quarter, and the home team starts with the ball. The quarterback throws the ball to number twenty-one with a perfect spiral. The crowd goes wild as he runs down the field, but he is tackled and can’t get up. The crowd freezes as silence washes over the stadium, except twenty one’s wails of agony. The paramedics rush in with a gurney, and takes him away. Number 21 is out for the rest of the season. If he had been in the stands with the band, he wouldn’t have torn his ACL. That is why sports are dangerous. That is why music education is a vital part of schooling and should take precedence over sports. …show more content…
(Chira.) In one of the many studies that Dr. Collins has funded, it has been proven that music education interacts with the brain the same way a foreign language would, as music education seems to touch every part of the brain. (See Figure 1- Epstein.) That being said, cutting music education programs and their funding for more teachers who can speak more than one language is completely useless, and a step in the wrong direction. Even though 42 states require that the schools all have access to music education, only 32 require an arts credit to graduate. The line can even be clouded because some schools, much like Shelbyville High School, count foreign languages as a Fine Arts credit. (Chira.) Of course, schools would find a loop hole to keep kids in football, baseball, and volleyball instead of band, choir, and drama. South Carolina is the only state that has music education as a standard subject. The students there have to prove that they have mastered the areas of music they are taught to even graduate. (Chira.) It’s a good thing that one state requires it because some don’t even have music programs. In New York City, two out of twenty-three school districts have an art/music teacher in every school. (Chira.) Only 6.25% of schools have the music education that children and teens so desperately need. Mr. Joe Amato, director of …show more content…
They believe, as some have programmed them to, that because they don 't get straight A 's or aren 't in the starting line up on the basketball team makes them feel as if they 're an outcast, like they 're looked down upon by any hot-shot with a cheerleading uniform or jerseys. Those who are in both, though, feel tension when they try to choose. Joselyn Lewis, an eighth grader in the Shelbyville Symphonic Band, is a volleyball player and a clarinetist. She has felt confliction between the two events, as volleyball and pep band run around the same time. Joselyn has said many times how she would rather be at band than at volleyball, but her mother sees her as an outcast and makes her go to volleyball. It 's not uncommon for a parent to force their child into sports. According to LIVESTRONG, pushy parents are one of the negative aspects of sports (Silverman.) Sports requires the students to participate to fit into a certain role. They have a certain way they 're supposed to act, snobby cheeleaders as an example, and that becomes who they are. Through music education, students are allowed to be who they truly are. As the wise Greek philosopher, Plato, once said, "Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything." Music education is made up of very many curriculums (See Figure 2.) Many people look at

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