Invertebrate Diversity

Great Essays
This study examined the effects of physical factors on diversity in freshwater environments by observing invertebrate diversity in riffles and pools in a freshwater stream. It was hypothesized that differences in invertebrate diversity between riffles and pools would be due to physical factors in the environment. To test this hypothesis, invertebrates were collected from each environment and classified by their taxa, and Shannon-Simpson indices were produced from these data to analyze the differences in diversity between the two environments. It was found that pools have a significantly greater species abundance, while riffles have a significantly greater species evenness. These results can be used to further examine changing abiotic factors, …show more content…
J. Jennings et al (1992). Specifically, in freshwater habitats, abiotic factors such as temperature and dissolved oxygen levels largely determine the size and diversity of the community the habitat is able to support (L. R. Bodensteiner et al., 2011).
In this present study, two freshwater stream environments were studied: riffles, which are rocky areas with fast-flowing, shallow water, and pools, which are areas of deeper, slow-moving water. The effects of biotic factors on species diversity have already been studied. Competition between freshwater, inhabiting organisms generally results in a decreased population size for both organisms and a displacement or elimination of one of the competing species (D. M. Baltz et al. 2011). This present study observes the effects of physical abiotic characteristics on organisms living in a freshwater ecosystem.
For this study, it was hypothesized that the types of invertebrates that inhabit each environment will differ due to physical differences between the riffles and pools. If this hypothesis is correct, it is predicted that riffles will have a higher species diversity due to physical, abiotic differences, such as nutrients, oxygen, and water
…show more content…
These findings supported the hypothesis that the types of invertebrates that inhabit riffles and pools will differ due to physical differences in the environments.
These findings were also supported by another study performed by P. Logan et al (1983). This study, performed in upland rivers in North America, did not investigate the effects of any biotic factors on populations in the two environments; rather, only the densities of the organisms in each environment were measured. This study found that riffles had a significantly greater mean density of invertebrates living in the benthic layer than pools did, which is consistent with the results of the present study.
A study performed by G. C. Hose et al (2004) also found that riffles had a greater species richness than pools. These differences in diversity were attributed to physical differences between the two environments, such greater temperature fluctuations and less dissolved oxygen in pools. Riffles provide an environment where the temperature is more stable and there is more dissolved oxygen, because riffles mix and agitate water more than pools do (G. C. Hose et al. 2004). Thus, riffles can better support a wide variety of

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Upwelling events bring up more nutrients where they can be used (surface layers) compared to fresh water runoff. The reason some plankton grow more when there is freshwater runoff is because of the drop in salinity…

    • 1253 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    After the final analysis of the data we can see that there is a difference in the fish community on the east and west side of dug run on the campus of the University of Northwestern Ohio based off of water quality but not species diversity. The conditions of the water did play a role determining which species could thrive in their respective area of the run and the fish diversity of Dug Run was not drastic enough to say that less species richness took place, but rather the pollution tolerance of the fish played a bigger role in where the fish wanted to…

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The first of these being the significant impact on the environment through the flora and fauna within this lake. As algae decomposes it uses oxygen (Environment Bay of Plenty et. al., 2009). Flora and fauna needs this oxygen to survive and thrive within this marine environment. However, if they do not have access to this requirement, it leads to a loss of biodiversity, as only certain species can survive within these conditions (Hautier, 2009).…

    • 1654 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If the water moves rapidly, there is usually more dissolved oxygen while if the water is still, there is usually less dissolved oxygen(Water properties: dissolved oxygen, 2016). Also, the concentration of dissolved oxygen is related to the temperature(Water properties: dissolved oxygen, 2016). If there is too little dissolved oxygen in the water, then eutrophication can occur(Water properties: dissolved oxygen, 2016). Also, too many organisms living in a water body can cause eutrophication because bacteria in the water breathe oxygen as the organic matter decays after the organisms die(Water properties: dissolved oxygen, 2016). Eutrophication can also happen if there are too many nitrates and phosphates(Nutrient pollution- eutrophication, 2008).…

    • 1390 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Water temperature can also affect “the metabolic rates and biological activity of aquatic organisms”. Therefore metabolic rates of aquatic organisms is directly proportional with the water temperature increment. As this will be obvious in respiration and digestive rate of the aquatic organisms which will result in increment in Dissolved Oxygen (DO) consumption. Whenever, (DO) falls below the acceptable limits for aquatic organisms, it will become stressed or tends to move to cooler or warmer water which will affect migrating routines. Furthermore, temperature fluctuation can affect aquatic plants throughout respiration and photosynthesis such as algae.…

    • 1545 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Ada Hayden Lake Essay

    • 960 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Nitrogen and phosphorus are the major limiting nutrient elements in a variety of aquatic ecosystems and are altered by anthropogenic activities; such as row crops, feed lots, and humans (Elser et al. 2007). Larger inputs of nitrogen cause an abundance of phytoplankton and macrophyte production (Ferree and Shannon 2001).The purpose of this study was to examine nitrogen and phosphorus levels at Ada Hayden Lake in the comparative context of their effect on phytoplankton abundance as well as toxicity. Based on previous labs, we have found Ada Hayden Lake to be mesotrophic-eutrophic; this supported our prediction. According to Table 2 in the appendices, the amount of D.O.…

    • 960 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The direct effect of this is low production in natural fish food (Phytoplankton – Zooplankton species) thus resulting in overall low fish productivity. The bloom of macrophyte vegetation result also in massive fish kills due to high oxygen demand and competition for available nutrients. These invasive aquatic macrophytes affect biodiversity as well as water quality (Uka et al 2009b).Submerged species can also spoil the gravel spawning beds of some fish (Salmonids in particular) and high densities of photosynthesizing macrophytes are capable of causing large fluctuations in oxygen, this can stress many fish species. Similarly, fish mortality may ensue when photosynthesis does not exceed respiration (under prolong hot and cloudy condition) thus resulting in oxygen…

    • 3204 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Road Salt Research Paper

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Many studies showed that road salt has negative effects on the survival rate of amphibian populations. According to Karraker, N. E., Gibbs, J. P., Vonesh, J. R., they found that large quantities of road salt decreased survival in both Spotted salamanders and Wood frogs. Survival of their embryos also decreased significantly. Amphibians have a lower chance to metamorphose, which is the process of an organism to develop into an adult, causing a lower a survival rate. Sanzo, D., and Hecnar, S. J.…

    • 723 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Colder the water better as higher temperature also plays a role in increasing the toxic ammonia concentration in the water. Temperatures below 15oC are preferred but up 20oC would be acceptable. If possible using chillers the water temperature should be brought…

    • 1943 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Giant Catfish Case Study

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Dam constructions reduce the flow nutrients in sediment loads. Dams change the flow of river and alter the speed and timing of seasonal floods. Change in the temperature of water. Blocks fish migrations. Change in water quality that can alter spawning behaviour for fish.…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays