Invasive Species Effects

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Invasive species are easily comparable to the explorers of the old days. Explorers could be helpful by introducing new supplies, like horses, during the big Columbian Exchange. Explorers could also be largely negative, bringing disease and slavery into the nations they conquered. Explorers sometimes just set up trade relations and left well enough alone. Much like these explorers, invasive species have the propensity to help, hurt, or assimilate into their new surroundings. Experts on invasive species are saying, “in principle it is recognized that abundance (and therefore impact) of invasive species vary among sites” (Hansen et al., 2013, p 2). Each environment is different from another, meaning that invasive species can influence environments …show more content…
Invasive species can set up unfavorable relationships with the native species in the invaded ecosystem. Kornis, Sharma, Jake Vander Zanden, and Ricciardi, the scientists behind the study “Invasion Success and Impact of an Invasive Fish, Round Goby, in Great Lakes Tributaries“ (2013), stated that some causes for calamitous relationships are because of “diet and habitat overlap” (p 186). When competing for resources in an environment in which native species typically had no issue, the host species often have a harder time winning this competition. This ultimately leads to a lack of abundance. An invasion of a cladoceran in the Black Seas during the 1980s resulted in such an occurrence. The native zooplankton suffered a huge loss of abundance in the Great Lakes next to the Black Seas (Emerson, Bollens, & Counihan, 2015, p …show more content…
Introduced and native species can develop positive relationships with each other. Kornis et al. (2013) claimed that when the invasive round goby was introduced into the Great Lakes, the sites the round goby invaded had both a “significantly greater Shannon diversity and species richness compared to non-invaded sites” (p 189). Another example of these positive relationships is the Asian copepod that invaded the Columbia and Snake Rivers, and in all the sites in which it was present, there was a burst of different zooplankton in different seasons; however, in the site that the copepod did not invade, there was no bloom of any zooplankton (Emerson et al., 2015, p 37). Both examples suggest cases where the invasive species improved the abundance and biodiversity of the native

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