Washington Vs. Dubois: A Comparative Analysis

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As the leader of the blue-ribbon committee, it is my job to expose the race relations occurring in the country right now. The relationship between African Americans and whites is very toxic. At the end of the Civil War, several opportunities were granted to African Americans such as voting rights, citizenship and the abolition of slavery however, African Americans never felt that these rights were granted to them. The problems that need to be addressed are the lack of integration of African Americans in the south and the dehumanizing cycle of manual labor for African Americans. Our job is to provide to provide equal opportunities to African Americans. Several policies were implemented by the government in an attempt to end the mistreatment …show more content…
Both believed that there should be different approaches to the way African Americans gained this right. Washington wanted to teach students hygiene care along with teaching them how to gain a professional degree. After gaining professional degree, students should use the new ideas that they learned to develop new ideas for the farming lifestyle. (Washington, Chapter 8 “We wanted to give them an education as would fit…”) One of Washington’s famous speeches was given at the Atlanta Exposition. In the speech, he advocated that whites and blacks should work together in advancing a stronger industrial progress for the future. The strengths of Washington’s approach are learning a skill, not just for educational purposes but for industry usage as well. The weaknesses were the push for African Americans to accept segregation and the fact that this approach would not gain political and social equality for them. One advocate who did not support Washington’s claim was W.E.B. Dubois. Dubois advocated separation of blacks from whites would lead to African American economic cooperation among themselves, pride and self-confidence, and a self-defense mechanism to challenge whites, self-segregate. Dubois’ challenge was to create black autonomy over conquering the whites ruling. (Rucker, pg.38) Dubois strengths lied in his challenging the authority to change legislation. He constantly challenged the legality of the laws and wanted blacks to work together to fight the laws. His weakness was his approach to improve African American life failed in the Plessy v. Ferguson case because Plessy challenged that he was 7/8 white and the state still ruled that he was African American. The state argued that his features were distinct too express that he was African American. Washington’s argument is more directed towards the attitude of resulting back to slavery with

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