Def Vs Dubois

Improved Essays
In American history, there has been a plethora of individuals who have gone down in the books as the best of the best in their contribution to African American history, both the past and the present. African American history has dated as early as 1903 with W.E.B Dubois to Yasiin Bey aka Mos Def in 1984. These two phenomenal activists all paved the way for a long legacy of Black culture, music, education, and social justice.Today, the two of these activists lie in many social movements, including the Black Lives Matter movement with similar ideas, feelings and issues . W.E.B Dubois and Mos Def both introduce racism, including African American lynchings and social issues that went on from early 1900’s until present day. To begin with, W.E.B Dubois …show more content…
Yasiin Bey was born on December 11th, 1973 in Brooklyn, New York. Bey is an activist, comedian, recording activist, actor and comedian. He started in 1999 with his first album being Afrocentric, and stating that he is bringing hip hop back to its soapbox roots. His music was full of soul and power, relating to several social issues, political issues and police brutality. In 2000, Yasiin created a project named “ Hip hop for respect” against police brutality. Following that he appeared on a television show called 4real to discuss crime and social problems within the community. Also, contributing in Black owned movies like Spike Lee’s film “ Bamboozled”. Yasiin Bey has been a phenomenal activist in the 21st century, as W.E.B Dubois was a phenomenal activist in the 20th century in which they both created huge associations, panels, congress and projects, which contributed to Black culture, Africa, and Unity. The paradigm is reflected in Yasiin work because throughout his music he references Africa, slavery, and muslim. He also discusses his feelings on tv shows, movies that discuss these topics and interviews. Mos Def feels that Black unity is hard to come by being in America. According to radio.com, He states “It’s really America’s a very challenging place for …show more content…
I also noticed how these two had two totally different methods in telling the story of racism, contributing to the abolishment of brutality, unequal treatments. Yasiin Bey chose a lyrical route and W.E.B Dubois chose the written route, specifically by creating 21 books. While writing and reflecting on this assignment, I noticed that not only could they create change, but they both did it in two different ways. Seeing that made me question why my generation always says “ oh we can’t do nothing”. I believe just as these two created their own routes to show us our roots and history, we could create a way too. Currently, our parents generation and my generation are currently involved in flourishing the Black Lives Matter movement, which shows the most current deaths, police brutality, inequality, and racism. It is a social movement like our ancestors, but its from us not them. Using primary sources is helpful in African American studies because it allows you to see what actually occurred and the emotions/feelings behind it. Also, it shows how we can also contribute to our

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