Vladimir Nabokov Analysis

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Through the dreary town of Prague to the hilly far side of Germany, Nabokov composed Hermann; a chocolatier with a mission. Vladimir Nabokov distracted the reader with many complex characters that Hermann encountered on his journey. His extensive use of symbols not only gave meaning and a sense of importance to objects but allowed the reader to connect them with a theme throughout Despair. Various literary elements were also used to animate objects. Nabokov brought life to the non-living through his broad use of personification. From Vladimir Nabokov’s picturesque story, the reader lost sight in the narcissistic side of Hermann. His actions were covered up by the pictures created in the reader’s mind, the symbols of many objects and the portrayal of humanistic objects.
Felix is introduced in Despair as Hermann’s doppelganger, or so it is to be
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Society usually relates the color yellow with happiness and joy. Unfortunately, in the book, Despair, the color yellow seen throughout the entirety of the story is more related to the yielding of danger. The foreshadowing of the yellow post-Hermann decides to inform the reader about, is no mistake. When Hermann had a dream, he was visualizing Felix and then Hermann mentioned seeing the yellow post (52). The mention of the yellow post also came about when Hermann was headed to the mailbox to send his letter to Felix, informing him of his devious plan. (118). “I rocked with laughter as I sat on the bench. Oh, do I erect a monument there (a yellow post) by all means!” (120). Hermann’s wicked laugh came from what he thought to believe, a brilliant plan, and he just so happened to see a yellow post. Coincidence? Nabokov continued to mention the yellow post and foreshadow its importance up to the climax of when Hermann killed his doppelganger, Felix. Nabokov deliberately continued to mention this symbol to keep the reader on their toes and question, why a yellow

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