Victor's Relationship In Frankenstein

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In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein and his creation represent a relationship between creator and the created while also forming a doppelganger relationship. It is difficult to interpret which side, either Victor or the creature, represents good and which represents evil. The more Victor pursues his dream of creating a Being; he slowly slips from being a brilliant scientist to being an insane mad man looking to play God. His thirst for knowledge before the existence of his creation, is described, “It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the …show more content…
However, the closer Victor became to completing the creature, he is more enclosed, darker, misguided. He unconsciously proves that that it’s no longer a quest to Frankenstein anymore; it’s an obsession. One would initially assume the monster is the evil, yet it is Dr. Frankenstein who creates the monster and then hides from the responsibility. His cowardice not only leads to the death of his younger brother, but also to that of the young girl accused of his murder. The monster has moments of great intellect and rationality and simply requests another creation so that he may not be so lonely in the world, only because his own creator has abandoned him in the first place. When the creature confronts Victor in the glaciers he says, “I expected this reception… All men hate the wretched; how, then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living …show more content…
Do your duty towards me, and I will do mine towards you and the rest of mankind. If you will comply with my conditions, I will leave them and you at peace; but if you refuse, I will glut the maw of death, until it be satiated with the blood of your remaining friends’ (Frankenstein 113). He even acts as somewhat of a conscious of Frankenstein's. Because of Victor's selfish and evil actions, the monster haunts him endlessly. Inevitably, Victor ends up in a hellish, barren wasteland being chased by his own creation. First of all, Dr. Victor Frankenstein feels uncontrollably compelled to create animation in the lifeless body. He can see the devastation his creation will cause in the future to him, yet he does it anyway. It is as if he is fated to create the monster. This lack of control may come both from the evil inside him, as well as outer forces of the world. Ultimately, the monster becomes a kind of external embodiment of Frankenstein's increasingly divided and conflicted personality while the monster's ugliness makes him the image of a purely intellectual, heartless Victor, the opposite of the young man who begins his studies with hope and the desire to contribute to the improvement of

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