Radical Behaviorism And Social Learning Theory

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Behaviorism and Social Learning Theory
In this theory, there is a lot of focus on the topics of behaviorism and social learning. Behaviorism is the study of observable behavior, phenomena that can be empirically verified and the social learning theory proposes that learned behaviors are mediated by thoughts, expectations, and emotions. First off is classical behaviorism, which includes classical conditioning. Next is Thorndike: The Law of Effect. Thirdly, covers Radical Behaviorism and BF Skinners ideas on operant conditioning. Finally, details on social learning theory and Clark Hull’s ideas along with Albert Bandura’s.
Classical behaviorism includes classical conditioning. Watson proposed an experiment that involves a baby, a rat, and a loud
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Also, Thorndike had an idea and named it the law of effect. He concluded that consequence are greatly strengthened or weakened due to the S-R connections, while satisfiers are consequences that are sought and annoyers are those that are avoided. Next, BF Skinner introduced radical behaviorism. Operant conditioning involves operant behavior that indicates that humans operate the environment to get desired results. Reinforcers are consequences that strengthen the responses and punishers are consequences that decrease the responses. A major point in this topic is that punishment does not equal negative reinforcement. Finally, Clark Hull introduced his idea on social learning theory. Skinner combined internal and external processes. The concern was conditions and observable responses that were reinforcers. This introduced emotions, ideas, and other internal processes as intervening variables. S (stimulus)-R (response) is replaced by S (stimulus)-O (organism)-R (response). The social learning theory focuses on cognitive and social factors that connect to behavior. Albert Bandura also has some ideas on another topic, social cognitive learning. He had different views compared to other people. He took issue with the lack of human sample size and consideration of complex social factors. Bandura also considered psychodynamic concepts as unscientific. He believed that the determination of “normal” and “abnormal” behavior were value judgements and of little …show more content…
Another is that psychological functioning is accredited for by a reciprocal interaction of a person and the environmental determinants. I find that this theory and is certainly interesting. The confusing part is the different views from different people so it is hard to determine which way I want to look at it and apply it. Although I have some concerns there are positives to the theory. The operant behavior is spot on and I agree with it completely. I believe that it does relate and people do “operate” on the environment to produce their desired results. Behaviorism and social learning theory isn’t something I’d pick first and always want to use, but in some cases I feel like it does have a purpose and I would use it if needed to because it has good techniques and information to it. This theory is something that I do think can be useful in the social work field and definitely would feel comfortable using it some cases. Clark Hull, BF Skinner, and Albert Bandura all had some great ideas, even if they didn’t totally agree on some things and had different views that did tie together in some

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