Themes In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

1554 Words 7 Pages
A Letter from Mark Twain I am sure that many people in your time are familiar with my famed narrative The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This book has been known for its ability to stir up quite the quarrel between many people of both my time and your time. In the past, this book received some of the most abhorrent critiques of any book throughout the ages. It has been said that my narrative has “but little humor, and that of a coarse type” and “more suited for slums than to intelligent, respectable people”. As time went on, I expected people to better understand what I truly was trying to say in this novel, as the human race is supposed to “evolve” as time goes on, but lets just say this has not been the case and my claims of the decadence …show more content…
I present a multitude of complex themes in my “slum writing” that I feel every citizen of this country should learn from as the country as a whole would benefit greatly from such a horrid act. The fundamental themes of this book are racism and conformity. Now, some of the slower people might find themselves believing that I, myself, am a proponent of the judgment of another man or woman’s skin color whose is not the color of mine. This may cause them to take drastic measure such as censoring my writing and even banning it in some cases. I thought that this notion would have slowly died off as the human race became more “civilized” but I can see now how that is not the case as this crime is still being committed today. I can half-heartedly see how one might come to this conclusion after reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn with the repeated use of the word “nigger” and the appearance of slavery. People have gone as far to calling Huckleberry Finn “the most grotesque example of racist trash ever written.” These people obviously do not have any idea what they are talking about considering that anti-racist views can be seen throughout the book. An example of this can be seen in chapter 42 when the doctor claims that Jim is not a bad nigger. Even though this might not seem very drastic, it was a large step for the time. Here was a prominent man in the Antebellum South …show more content…
In the book, Huck plays as a foil to the character of Tom Sawyer. Tom Sawyer is a very educated boy who loves to read and comes from a very wealthy family. The only thing the two share is their love for adventure. Most of the negative reviews during my time mainly were written around the fact that I was writing from a much less civilized, and much less proper, point of view. This was frowned upon during my time simply because they did not have the intellect to understand what I was really trying to convey by foiling these two character and telling the story from Huck’s point of view. This is what caused me to receive some of the reviews aforementioned about my writing not being for the most civilized of folk. They did not understand that by doing such I was attempting to show how the character of Huckleberry Finn who directly defied the idea of social conformity, what many believe to be the right way to live, was able to make much more moral decisions. He understood the hypocrisy of the white Christians who at the time claimed to be “pure” but enslaved people at the same time. As time progressed, people have begun to understand this theme more readily, but it is still not the unanimous understanding which I had expected it to

Related Documents