Huckleberry Finn Conflicts

2143 Words 9 Pages
Huckleberry Finn and Jim are new to the place and they fail to locate the mouth of the Ohio. They continue their voyage but their steamboat crashes down and both are separated unfortunately the next night. Huckleberry Finn is at the home of the kindly Grangerfords, a family of Southern aristocrats locked in a harsh and childish dispute with a neighboring clan, the Shepherdsons. The elopement of a Grangerford daughter with a Shepherdson son results in a gun fight in which a lot of people in the families are slaughtered hardheartedly. While Huck is caught up in the dispute, Jim comes again with the repaired raft. Huckleberry Finn rushes to Jim’s hiding place, and they take off down the river. People find a reason to fight among themselves and …show more content…
He was tortured and ill-treated by his father in his early days. He was not supported or helped by no one from his village. He suffered without food, clothing and care. But all of a sudden the village people show their great concern on him and this confuses him. The generosity shown by Widow Douglas is mysterious to him. He does not to judge either people or the society. The two phases of his life style make him to doubt the society where he too is considered as a member. His two phases of life and his travel experiences with Jim force him to think and analyse the values followed in the society. He thinks about his place in the society as a representative of white man and the position of Jim and his suffering. According to the American law Jim is considered as the mere property of Miss Watson forgetting his values and feelings. As far as Huckleberry Finn Jim has every right to lead a free life as this universe belongs to him as well. Huck’s inborn astuteness and his readiness to think through state of affairs on its personal qualities guide him to reach some conclusions that are acceptable and proper in their context but that would upset and alarm the white society. Hence Huck thinks that his lies to save Jim from the slave hunters are good for the safety of Jim and he never feels guilty of his deeds. Though he at times feels guilty of looting money, he consoles himself by thinking that his action of protecting …show more content…
But the society’s role should be viewed with hostility. In spite of his experience he fails to decide to take a stand because of the constant instructions from the society. Comparatively Tom Sawyer who is the friend and guide of Huckleberry Finn shows remarkable intelligence and compassion. He understands life better than Huck. Jim seems to be superstitious and irrational to the point of ridiculousness, but a cautious analysis of the time. The time spent by Huck and Jim on Jackson’s Island discloses Jim’s superstitions. Besides his superstitious beliefs he possesses indepth knowledge of the natural world. His understanding about the world indicates his power of observation and

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