Huckleberry Finn Conflicts

Superior Essays
Huckleberry Finn and Jim are new to the place and they fail to locate the mouth of the Ohio. They continue their voyage but their steamboat crashes down and both are separated unfortunately the next night. Huckleberry Finn is at the home of the kindly Grangerfords, a family of Southern aristocrats locked in a harsh and childish dispute with a neighboring clan, the Shepherdsons. The elopement of a Grangerford daughter with a Shepherdson son results in a gun fight in which a lot of people in the families are slaughtered hardheartedly. While Huck is caught up in the dispute, Jim comes again with the repaired raft. Huckleberry Finn rushes to Jim’s hiding place, and they take off down the river. People find a reason to fight among themselves and …show more content…
He was tortured and ill-treated by his father in his early days. He was not supported or helped by no one from his village. He suffered without food, clothing and care. But all of a sudden the village people show their great concern on him and this confuses him. The generosity shown by Widow Douglas is mysterious to him. He does not to judge either people or the society. The two phases of his life style make him to doubt the society where he too is considered as a member. His two phases of life and his travel experiences with Jim force him to think and analyse the values followed in the society. He thinks about his place in the society as a representative of white man and the position of Jim and his suffering. According to the American law Jim is considered as the mere property of Miss Watson forgetting his values and feelings. As far as Huckleberry Finn Jim has every right to lead a free life as this universe belongs to him as well. Huck’s inborn astuteness and his readiness to think through state of affairs on its personal qualities guide him to reach some conclusions that are acceptable and proper in their context but that would upset and alarm the white society. Hence Huck thinks that his lies to save Jim from the slave hunters are good for the safety of Jim and he never feels guilty of his deeds. Though he at times feels guilty of looting money, he consoles himself by thinking that his action of protecting …show more content…
But the society’s role should be viewed with hostility. In spite of his experience he fails to decide to take a stand because of the constant instructions from the society. Comparatively Tom Sawyer who is the friend and guide of Huckleberry Finn shows remarkable intelligence and compassion. He understands life better than Huck. Jim seems to be superstitious and irrational to the point of ridiculousness, but a cautious analysis of the time. The time spent by Huck and Jim on Jackson’s Island discloses Jim’s superstitions. Besides his superstitious beliefs he possesses indepth knowledge of the natural world. His understanding about the world indicates his power of observation and

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Tom manipulates Jim for his own enjoyment, not understanding the moral implications. Furthermore, black Jim is defenseless against white, socially-superior Tom. Professor Leo Marx pointed out that “[o]n the raft he was an individual, man enough to denounce Huck when Huck made him the victim of a practical joke” (Marx, 5). While this may make it seem as though Jim devolved as a character, it shows that, after all, society has taught Jim to believe himself to be a slave when not with Huck on the raft, forever inferior to white men and unable to defend himself. Additionally, because Tom is knowledgeable of Jim’s actual freedom, he believes that he can merely pay Jim back for his troubles after the ordeal.…

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the cabin, Pap is shown to be hostile to Huck; he returns to the cabin drunk and beats Huck frequently. Huck describes one of the encounters: “By-and-by he rolled out and jumped up on his feet looking wild and he see me and went for me.” (35). When Huck fears that Pap could soon actually kill him, he fakes his death and plans his escape by taking his father’s canoe down the river to Jackson’s Island. Considering all that has happened to Huck, this was likely why he does not seem to think for himself and why he decided to follow along with Tom. Huck was traumatized by the abuse of his father and had no courage to think for himself.…

    • 797 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One of the biggest ways this is revealed is through Jim. Huck starts to show his love and respect for him more and more, Huck keeps it a secret from Jim that they are not really Dukes and Kings, but instead conmen. This secret shows a level of compassion and the fact that Huck does not want Jim to worry. Although the conmen can be positive influences, they can also be negative. With their arrival, Huck gets back in the mindset of a robber and starts to think “what would Tom do in this situation”.…

    • 1089 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Nick can be a kind person but is judgmental and rude at times to other people and their lifestyles. To continue, Nick is unreliable as a narrator because he makes rude comments about other people. Nick says, “I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me” (Fitzgerald 1). Nick states that he is a kind person and is a trustworthy friends but he is unreliable because he judges them for their choice. The author wrote, “Nick is constantly making judgements and associations that spring from his own education.…

    • 1304 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The narrator understands that Bartleby is different than his other employees, but he does not understand Bartleby’s reasoning as to why he is the way he is. Bartleby simply rejects the narrator’s directions for his work by saying he “would prefer not to” (14). That simple line is the majority of what Bartleby says, which angers the narrator because he gives no further reasoning. His excessive passiveness is bothersome to the narrator because Bartleby does not give a straight answer to his boss. The narrator’s dark feelings begin to formulate his dark thoughts from Bartleby’s difficult behavior.…

    • 1229 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Being an abolitionist and saving innocent lives is considered a reprehensible act in the society. In reality Huck has done nothing immoral but living in the society has completely changed his conscience. Consequently making him battle whether he should tell Miss Watson about Jim’s whereabouts and says “It would get all around that Huck Finn helped a nigger to get his freedom; and if I was ever to see anybody from that town again I’d be ready to get down and lick his boots for shame” (Twain, 212). By helping Jim, Huck is conscious about his image in the society and would do anything to redeem his reputation if it gets spoilt, even if he has to lick boots. Basically, helping a human being escape to his freedom is considered shameful and immoral in the white society.…

    • 894 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Although Huck describes his actions as "dirty low-down business", he does it anyway because his truth, which is relative to him, is that Jim is noble and deserves to be free. Huck takes a major risk by asking Tom to help him steal Jim, which exhibits the extent to which Huck is willing to go to save his friend. The feelings that Huck has developed towards Jim have allowed him to neglect society’s standards and make decisions based upon his intuition for good. Therefore this is a large step for Huck in terms of morality because he no longer relies upon society or religion to dictate his decisions. Huck also describes himself as "low-down", which gives us insight to the way Huck perceives himself and how he is fine with being low-down if it means saving a friend.…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Huckleberry Finn Humanity

    • 1674 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Like any white person in his time, Huck at first thinks of his abetting Jim as stealing because Jim is considered property. But as the story progresses, he may still remains divided, but continues to help Jim because, according to Twain, Huck would still feel badly if he turns him in (106). And by the end of the novel, Huck "knowed he was white inside" (Twain 300). This is to say that Huck considers Jim an equal despite his outward appearance. Huck, in his time period, does the unthinkable by saving and then befriending a black man.…

    • 1674 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Scout does not comprehend why because Atticus is the opposite of the citizens in Maycomb. She expects everyone to be as honest and fair as Atticus. She fails to see that Atticus is a rare man. One source states, “He manages at once to be of and not of Maycomb; he has defined an individual self not in opposition to others” (Phelps). Atticus recognizes the complexity of this situation and does not desire to add fuel to the fire.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    His happiness and the help to the society made him want to present this idea to the school of the scholars. “ How dare you think that your mind held greater wisdom than the minds of your brother?” (Rand 71). But this behavior was not acceptable by the councilors because this showed disrespect towards the rules which acted like a boundary between social classes. All the hard work and suffering Equality went through, had to be ended because the society in which Equality lives individuals don’t exist. The society sees the idea of one being able to hold its own ideas as a sin.…

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays