Huck Finn Theme Of Morality

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In the American classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain addresses the conflict between the dictates of one’s society and the contradictory dictates of one’s own conscience through the protagonist Huck Finn. As society challenges Huck and his own beliefs, he chooses to follow the dictates of his own conscience; his moral character develops and the major themes of racism and humanity shine through. In the beginning of the novel, Huck feels no moral guilt in relation to how he treats Jim or any African-American for that matter. The society in which Huck lives tells him that African-Americans are not to be treated as fully-human. Huck does not question this at first and goes along with what society tells him, or face …show more content…
Though Jim ran away on his own accord, Huck still feels that he is responsible. For a moment, Huck reverts back to his old way of thinking and feels that his soul is in jeopardy. In feeling this, Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson to tell her where Jim is, and after writing this he “felt good and all washed clean of sin for the first time I had ever felt so in my life” (161). However, upon reflection of their adventure together, Huck realizes that Jim has done nothing but good for him. Despite what his society has told him, Huck listens to his morals and shreds his letter. Huck decides, “ ‘Alright then, I’ll go to hell’ -and tore it up… And I let them stay said; and never thought no more about reforming” (162), which is the ultimate rejection of his old way of life. Huck has been told that to go to “the bad place” (2) is the absolute worst thing that can happen to him, but he decides he would rather go there than betray his friend. It is through this moment that the reader can see that Huck has fully developed his own morals and chooses to deny his society in order to protect Jim. Huck makes a conscious decision to recognize the humanity within Jim and feels deep loyalty towards this man that was once no more than property to Huck.
In conclusion, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn revolves around the internal conflict between society and Huck’s own morals. By facing this conflict, Huck rejects racism and recognizes that Jim is human rather someone’s

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