Essay On Racism In Huck Finn

Superior Essays
Our Convictions Towards Racism The defining factor of racism lies within the context of our hypocritical and ignorant beliefs of supremacy during the post-civil war era of American society. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, challenges the racial adversity and social oppression that became prominent throughout the mid 1800’s with a story about rebellious individuals who broke free from the reigns of the civilized world. Main characters Huck and Jim became the representing factors that define the truth behind breaking the stereotypes of racism in American history. The story centrally revolves around a sadistic town which exposes the reality of post-civil war slavery and society. In the face of racial adversity, Mark Twain is …show more content…
For example, as Pap downgrades a mixed-race individual in town to Judge Thatcher he says, “Oh, yes, this is a wonderful government, wonderful, why looky here there was a free nigger there from Ohio-a mulatter, most as white as a white man” (27). The use of the n-word in the context of Twain’s writing essentially revolves around southern jargon which was fully acceptable during that time. Twain’ depiction of Pap saying such a repulsive statement adds hostility to his work and it gives the reader a sense of distaste for the way Pap speaks. Pap’s innate nature shows the stereotypes of many white supremacists towards negro slaves thus exposing the true racist culture of that age. In addition, Marry Williams of SALON states “because of the mistreatment if every one who wasn’t/isn’t white..America is constantly defending itself instead of dealing head-on with the wrongs that it willingly played a role in.” The n-word is a grave reminder of the oppressive stain that has left remnants in our nation’s past and Twain uses this …show more content…
For example, as Huck reminisces his feats with Jim he says, “I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that too” (214). Huck holds on to Jim as a father figure who accepted and cared for him when others did not accept who he was. The civilized world robbed Jim of his freedom and Huck realized that skin and race do not translate into love, companionship, and friendship. Racism is not a playing factor in this story; in fact, it is anti-racism that leads the two most unlikely individuals to become friends. In addition, Ralph Waldo Ellison once said, "Huckleberry Finn knew, as did Mark Twain, that Jim was not only a slave but a human being and a symbol of humanity... and in freeing Jim, Huck makes a bid to free himself of the conventionalized evil taken for civilization by the town.” Slavery was a religion that was idolized, praised, witnessed, respected, and supported and its lasting effects on our society are still prominent today. We announce racism as an unjust hate towards other individuals of different cultures because we still consider ourselves as separate groups. Some may say that Jim’s dialogue within the story is offensive and should be censored. That should not be the case because Twain is trying to emulate the authentic type of jargon that was used during the mid 1800’s. Jim and

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