The Trinitarian Controversy

Improved Essays
The Trinitarian Controversy
The Trinitarian controversy lasted from 318 to 382. There was tension between how we understand God which exists today. This controversy existed at an early stage; a period which is known Arianism. Arius was a Christian in Alexandria, Egypt. Arius wrote a letter to his Eusebius addressing this tension and his stance. He was opposed to the views of Eusebius regarding the trinity and the nature of Christ. Arius believed that God is with out a beginning and that the son has a beginning… “Before he was begotten…He was not” (Hardy, pg 333). Although somewhat obscure, Arian then made a confession which addressed Alexander of Alexandria. In his confession, he stated there is only one God, the only begotten without a beginning.
…show more content…
The west resurrected Tertullian’s view in the debate in that Christ was two natures in one person. This reasoning balanced and helped a compromise to be reached between the East and its notions but the controversy was still not over. The Nicene Creed which took place prior in the Trinitarian Controversy was still an issue. Apollinaris of Laodicea who was a strong supporter of the the Nicene Creed believed he could help the situation. He formulated a doctrine which stated that Christ had no human spirit. He claimed that “in Jesus, the Word of God, the second person of the Trinity, took the place of the rational soul ( Gonzalez pg297)”. This formulated the word “logos”. Which means the word of God- took the place of the human spirit and performed its normal …show more content…
Once again there were opposing views but a formula of union was established between Cyril and John of Antioch. The Formula of Union is an important step in the Chalcedonian Decree. Cyril continued to announced that he holds fast to his teaching of Athanasius and of the fathers of Nicaea and sends John a correct copy of Athanasius’ Letter to Epictetus since corrupt versions were circulating (Hardy pg358). In 433, an agreement between Antioch and Alexandria was reached. The division increased between the two parties increased. Cyril represented the majority of the Eastern Church. He emphasized the divine in the person of Christ. Although he rejected Apollinarianism, his tendency was that of Apollinaris. Cyril died in 444 and was succeeded by Dioscurus. Dioscurus faced many oppositions and planned attacks to in favor of his belief while the bishop of Constantinople, Flavin did not (Gonzalez, 300). This controversy was later settled by a second council meeting in Ephesus where it was decided that Christ is divine and

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Athanasius was the chief deacon assistant to Bishop Alexander of Alexandria. A man called Arius denied that Christ was fully God. He claimed that Christ was father’s creation and thus Christ wasn’t supposed to be considered as God, arguing on a fact that Christ could not offer salvation (Dennison, Jr.). Athanasius challenged this view by giving examples of his own. The incarnation of the Word is his most famous writing (Galli).…

    • 1729 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Nestorius

    • 1281 Words
    • 6 Pages

    1 Nestorius placed a special emphasis on the humanity of Jesus. He began preaching against the title Theotokos or Mother of God, beginning to be used of the Virgin Mary. He distinguished between the logos (“divine nature”) and Christ (the Son, the Lord) as a union of divine nature and human nature. He refused to attribute the human acts and the sufferings of Jesus to the divine nature, arguing that God could not suffer on the cross, as God is omnipotent. Therefore the Virgin Mary, could not be viewed as the Mother of God, but simply as the mother of a man.…

    • 1281 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Arius denied that Christ was really and completely God, contending from the Bible that just the Father was genuinely God, and the Son was the firstborn of creation. Athanasius was his most outstanding adversary – and a minister in the same church. His principle conflict with Arius concerned salvation: we are spared on the grounds that in Christ God himself turned into a person and passed on a human demise. God turned into a human to make people divine; the unfading got to be mortal to raise mortals to everlasting life. No insignificant animal could accomplish this yet just the very Word of…

    • 104 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    “On the Incarnation” by Athanasius is an in depth explanation of who Christ is, what He came to do, how that was accomplished, and what the effects are of that in the world today. Athanasius makes an in depth case for Christ being fully God and fully man. He boldly argues for it, responding to the Jews, Gentiles, and heretics of the day. What is not as overtly emphasized, but equally important, is the role of the Trinity. Indeed, this book shows that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are one God, yet they each have important roles to play in the process of salvation.…

    • 1008 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Pax Romana Religion

    • 518 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The conflict was by an Arian and a deacon Athanasius. This conflict was whether the Son of God, who walked the world in human flesh as Jesus Christ, was really and truly divine. Arian’s position was that if God had any imperfection Jesus restoration would still be imperfect. And that humanity continues to head down the path of annihilation due to transgressions. Athanasius objected to Arian's reasoning.…

    • 518 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In The Gnostics: Myth, Ritual, and Diversity in Early Christianity, David Brakke argues for an approach for the rethinking of Gnosticism and its rejection by the Church. Gnosticism reveals as a diverse set of beliefs different from that of the early Christians. This book displays scholarly debates on the interpretation of Gnosticism and the ancient Christians. Some scholars argue that Gnosticism is a mark of imperfection and individuals should simply ignore it. On the other hand, modern scholars debate that Gnosticism provides evidence for early religious movements and the information helps to categorize them (4).…

    • 1693 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Martin Luther's Beliefs

    • 468 Words
    • 2 Pages

    He then created a theory of truth only faith not good deeds could bring person redemption and that no good works, rituals, etc. would save a person if they did not believe. 2. He believed that only faith could redeem a person and that no rituals would save a person if they did not believe. He even writes the 95 theses were he writes what he believes about the church sh.…

    • 468 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In 325 Constantine called the first ecumenical council, the council of Nicaea, and presided as judge on the issue of the trinity . On one side we had Arius, who argued Arianism, or that Jesus was subservient to God the father, having been allegedly been created by the father. On the other side, we had Athanasius of Alexandria arguing that Jesus and the Father were equals, created at the same time, and never existing without each other. What was important was that these two sides of the issues appealed and argued to Constantine, and in the end when Constantine decreed that the father and the son were equals, he banished Arius from the kingdom . Constantine placed himself as head of the Church, and now not only was the Emperor of Rome, but now was the Emperor of Christianity.…

    • 1017 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Arius lived in Alexandria and was a presbyter (Bingham 2002, 46). His interpretation of Bible verses such as Proverbs 8:22, Psalms 45:7-8, and John 1:14,18 (Bingham 2002, 46) just to name a few was “that God the Father had created the preexistent Son out of nothing; the Son was therefore different from the Father and inferior to him” (Grant 1975, 2). Alexandria’s bishop, Alexander disagreed with Arius interpretation. Various Bishops took sides, and the need arose to settle the dispute (Lane 2006,…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Rome along with the Latin Christian West was always distant and in conflict with the Christian World of the East, even before the adoption Christianity as the official religion of the empire. Following the establishment of two separate sections, with separate capitals, the Roman Empire acknowledged that they were two different worlds, especially after the decline of Rome and the rise of Constantinople by the turn of the 4th century. Emperor Constantine did his best to ensure its supremacy and unity under his command in particular by way of the results of the Council of Nicaea (325), the first of its kind, founding a uniform doctrine and church. Two things should be noted: a) That a large portion of this ecumenical council was dedicated not just to spell out one uniform doctrine the Nicene Creed but to fight and suppress the considerable influence of Arianism (Christ as a created human, not of divine nature), one of the many so-called Eastern controversies between 250 and 336, and b) That the Bishop of Rome, Pope Sylvester I, avoided attending, sending his legates instead.…

    • 300 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    One of the main points addressed at the council was the heretical teaching of Arianism. Arianism is the belief that Jesus Christ, while more divine than man, is subservient to God, and not part of the holy trinity. This theological division roared into the spotlight from a sermon given by then Bishop St. Alexender. Alexender proclaimed that the father, the son, and the holy spirit are one in the same and equal to one another, or better known as homoousion. A local Pastor named Arius (no stranger to controversy himself) immediately responded by labeling Alexander's statement Sabellianism, a belief that had already been denounced at that time.…

    • 1573 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Edict Of Milan Analysis

    • 1694 Words
    • 7 Pages

    This ambiguous text, spoken by Jesus himself, can lead Christians to believe that even Jesus agreed that he himself was not God but a creation of God. This concept of Jesus as a demigod created conflict within the church because many people believed that it implied that Christianity was polytheistic. This was an issue because the basis of Christianity is that there is one God who, in 6 days, created the heavens and earth, all the animals, the seas, and Adam and Eve. There is one God who wrote the 10 Commandments for the Israelites to follow, the first of which explicitly states: “You shall have no other Gods before Me,” specifically proving that Christianity is in fact a monotheistic religion. Because of all the confusion and tension within the Christian community over Arianism, Constantine held a meeting, later known as the Council of Nicaea, which…

    • 1694 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Trinitarianism Strengths

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages

    “Therefore the mind itself, love, and its knowledge are three specific things, and these three are one, and when they are perfect they are equal.” (Augustine, 167) Youth director Lucy’s analogy, three parts of mind: “memory, understanding, and will” are three natures, in one mind. For youth, it would be great sermon to use this analogy. Daniel L. Migliore argues that for responsible trinitarian thinking, it must always begin with the economic Trinity and immanent Trinity.…

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Irenaeus

    • 1206 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Irenaeus was born in second century Smyrna and was a student of Polycarp who in turn was a student of St. John the Evangelist. Eventually made bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul, Irenaeus is considered by some to be the Church's first systematic theologian. He primary opponents were the Gnostics who claimed a greater spiritual knowledge and believed the material world to be evil. As such, they asserted that Christ could not have been fully man. Rather, he either only appeared to be or else controlled the normal human man Jesus of Nazareth, leaving him at the crucifixion.…

    • 1206 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The development of Christology in the patristic period of Christianity was formed out of two main arguments, the logos’ relation with God and the logos’ relation with the human Jesus. It was of agreement that Jesus the Christ was on earth and that he was the logos, i.e. “Word of God” or “Son of God”. Two orators in particular drew the proverbial line in the sand between homoousios and homoiousios, of the same and of similar substance as the Father. This division was later coined the Arian Controversy after Arius failed to convince the Council of Nicaea (325 CE) of his position. Arius felt that the logos could not be of the same substance as God, but merely of similar substance.…

    • 1195 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays