The Themes Of A Totalitarian Government In 1984 By George Orwell

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George Orwell composed “1984”, a fictional story occurring in Oceania in the 1940s, after viewing the oppressive governments in Spain and Russia. Orwell’s manifest purpose behind publishing this novel was to warn the western countries of the perils presented along with totalitarian governments and to portray the conditions of subjects living under such regimes. The hidden knowledge given in this novel is that this world is going on the verge of losing their privacy and their opinions, even if there is no totalitarian government established. Orwell wrote this novel to not only instruct the people of those times, but to also call the posterity of Earth to action of the possible changes that can similarly befall on their country as well. George …show more content…
In the course of the story, George Orwell depicted many themes that were vital to its purpose and topic. In this novel Orwell portrays that too much authority situated into one organization always causes harm and people are influenced to believe them no matter what they do, since people do not want to rebel against power. This is the reason why every revolution needs a charismatic leader to light the fire in the hearts of the people which causes the downfall of every powerful person or organization. Orwell shows the fear in the hearts of people which causes people to not lead a revolt including Winston himself. For example, Winston did not like it when the government would change the facts, but Winston kept on working in this department and he changed the facts as well. For example to hide a person and the deed of the government, Winston comes up with a fictitious person Comrade Ogilvy. It says,” Comrade Ogilvy, unimagined an hour ago was now a fact. It struck him as curious that you could create dead men but not living ones….He would exist just as authentically, and upon the same evidence, as Charlemagne or Julius Caesar.” From this the reader sees that this government has excessive power that they can even change …show more content…
An example that combines repetition and paradox into one quote is when Orwell writes, “War is Peace Freedom is Slavery Ignorance is Strength.” This phrase is used by Orwell many times in his story. In this phrase he connects contradictory ideas, such as war and peace. Most people understand that where there is a peace there is no war, and where there is a war there is no peace, but the statement made in the novel contradicts that ideology. Not only does the government portray this statement, but they repeatedly project it and force the people of Oceania to accept this statement. This shows us the tremendous amount of power they impose on their subjects, similarly to many governments and terrorist groups around the world until this day. Nowadays people stand up even when a hint of their opinion is disseminated, but in this nation they are not even allowed to believe their own individual ideology. Knowledge of these facts causes the reader to be aware of these horrible organizations of government, and builds their opinion against such governments. A major reason why this has a major factor on Orwell’s writing is because when a reader hears something unusual he or she focuses their attention on it and they think more deeply about it, which is what happened with this line as well. A major symbol in this story is the telescreen which is a

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