The Stigma Of Mental Illness

Improved Essays
Many people who have a mental illness feel that it is something to be ashamed of due to the stigma associated with mental health. How horrible would it be if someone looked a cancer patient in the eye and said “it’s just cancer, get over it”. That is the kind of thing that happens daily to people with mental illness. A person fighting his or her mental illness is in a fight for his or her life just as a person battling cancer is. The biggest issue with that is when society stigmatizes people with mental illnesses it exacerbates the problem. The negative view of people with mental illness creates an added burden on that person, potentially making their illness worse. This stigma makes those who suffer from mental illness afraid to fully …show more content…
In all honesty, society has a responsibility to help ensure that people with mental illnesses do not feel ostracized and get the treatment they need and deserve; beginning by raising awareness, becoming more conscientious about how we treat them, and increasing the general population’s education on mental …show more content…
It is essential that society eradicate the stigma associated with mental illness. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIMH provides booklets, brochures, and fact sheets on their website to help raise awareness and increase mental health education. The booklets provide detailed information such as signs, symptoms, treatment, and current research of specific mental illnesses. The brochures are easy-to-read short publications with basic information about signs, symptoms, and related treatment. The fact sheets provide brief overviews and frequently asked questions about specific mental health topics. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), claims to be the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization who is dedicated educating others about mental illness and advocating for those who suffer mental illness. NAMI has a campaign called #IAmStigmafree. This campaign consists of three

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The power of stigmatizing mental illness Stigma within mental illness is a multifaceted issue that is debilitating, not only for the mentally ill, but to society as well. Stigmatizing those with mental illness is prevalent and potent; it does not build a society, but separates it. Misunderstandings about mental illness reinforce stigma and causes disassociation between society and the mentally ill. By creating social gaps, society makes it difficult for people with a mental illness to accept the illness, as well as integrating within society. Not only is the person with the mental illness coping with the symptoms of the illness, but with stigma as well, this inhibits progress (Angermyer, Corrigan, & Rüsch ,2005).Mental illness stigma is a debilitating…

    • 868 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    General Public Attitude

    • 1626 Words
    • 7 Pages

    They struggle with the symptoms of their disease. Also they struggle with how the people around them react to their disease. The general public’s attitude can very easily negative affect this suffers. They can suffer from self-stigma, economical problems and poor social relationships. People suffering from mental illnesses often struggle with self-stigma issues.…

    • 1626 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Stigma And Discrimination Essay

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited

    Stigma and discrimination can trap people in a cycle of illness. There are significant consequences to the public misperceptions and fears; stereotypes about mental health conditions have been used to justify bullying. For example, a child’s justification to abusing a fellow classmate on the basis that an illness they have, such as Autism, frustrates them. The child that cannot help but be a little delayed in responses or understanding will fall victim to the, either physical or verbal abuse that can affect him or her drastically. Some individuals have been denied adequate housing, health insurance and jobs due to their history of mental illness.…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    • 2 Works Cited
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Observing and assessing mental health needs of an individual provides adequate information on proper care for the person, and serves as the first element in observing changes in one’s behavior. Furthermore, the nurse must be competent in assessment skills so the outcome can be reported immediately if there is a threat to safety. Safety is a major concern when serving a mentally ill patient. Learning how to effectively communicate with a patient not only establishes rapport, but builds a trustworthy relationship. Another way professional nurses will be impacted if the bill passes is through education.…

    • 758 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    By people referring to the ADHD site. The site acknowledges the need to inform and educate families and society as a whole. The context of the website assists readers to understand what they otherwise would not be able to comprehend and to make sense of outside information that illuminates its meaning and relevancy. CDC’s site raises interesting issues regarding medications, which have been approved by the FDA approved to treat ADHD in children. Stimulants are the best known and wildly used whereas nonstimulants do not work as quickly as stimulants, and that different medications may need to be introduced due to medications effect children differently.…

    • 816 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mental Illness Stigma

    • 1143 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Mental illness is something that affects the lives of everyone on earth. Everyone either has, or knows someone who has, a mental illness. However, stigma surrounding mental illness is very prevalent, and can cause disastrous consequences to those facing it. Stigma can be defined in many different ways. After reviewing many articles, I have arrived at the following definition: Stigma is a mark that is assigned to a person, resulting in that person being seen as lesser in the eyes of others (Link, Yang, Phelan, & Collins, 2004; Feldman & Crandall, 2007; Martinez, Piff, Mendoza-Denton, & Hinshaw, 2011).…

    • 1143 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In regards to people with mental issues, the stigma exists because actions performed by this demographic are seen to be unpredictable and may be seen as uncomfortable. The reason for this could be because of a lack of education and awareness about mental illness. Some research suggest that the media is the likely culprit behind misinformation. Stigmas are usually expressed by people close to the person. When stigmas are expressed they could be outright discriminatory or could be implicitly expressed by limiting opportunities.…

    • 709 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Stigma Essay

    • 811 Words
    • 4 Pages

    What is Stigma? A growing issue within today’s society is the stigmatizing of people that may have a mental illness. Gail W. Stuart defined stigma as, “a mark of disgrace or discredit that is used to identify and separate out people whom society sees as deviant, sinful, or dangerous” (Stuart, 2013, p. 175). Stigma is being ignorant, having fear and guilt and discriminating against people who have a mental illness. The stigma of mental illness is what stops people from getting help because they are scared.…

    • 811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Identifying Mental Illness

    • 1322 Words
    • 6 Pages

    . these are all examples of unhealthy and self-destructive coping mechanisms. How can a person purposefully hurt themselves? Strong and oppressive feelings of loneliness, hopelessness, self-hate, fear, or emptiness can all be factors. Emotions guide humans through life; when negative emotions are fed, they become vaster and more influential.…

    • 1322 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The approach to recovery requires mental health services to develop resources that represent not only their own resources, but the developed resources of people with mental illness and their communities. Recovery can impact people when they take an active role to improving their lives, (O’Hagan 2003). Seymour (n.d) also suggests that consumers of mental health and their families can expect agencies to operate in a way that enables support towards recovery to maintain their well being, so that consumers can participate in society, preventing stigma, paving a way to recognition of acceptance and social inclusion. In reference to Gale and Marshall-Lucette (2012) there is evidence to suggest that stigma has a significant impact on consumers of…

    • 1160 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays