Oppression Of Children In William Blake's The Songs Of Innocence

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Oppression of children Similarities and differences can be drawn between the two poems in the manner Blake uses them to perpetuate his critiques against the society for its oppression. The two poems present the condition of innocent minor children who are sold off by their greedy parents to the wealthy in order to meet their needs. In the Songs of Innocence, a little boy is forced to go through the misery of exploitation with the hopes of a better tomorrow (Blake pp. 1-2). Unfortunately, the little boy is oblivious and unaware of the kind of injustices posed to him because of his innocence due to the young age. The Songs of Experience seems to echo the ordeal of the chimney sweeper …show more content…
In the Songs of Innocence, Blake presents two boys, Tom Dacre, and the narrator, with Tom being the more innocent of the two boys. Tom’s innocence is shown in the manner he is fond of crying. The narrator takes the mantle of responsibility for Tom to wipe off the misery the cruel society has subjected them to because of their innocence. Tom looks forward to a time when their problem will come to an end symbolized by their black soot being replaced by white in a dream of salvation by angels (Blake pp. 1-2). The thoughts act as a symbol of hope for the two boys who feel that their obedience will be paid off without knowing the society continues to gain big from their obedience. The dream of the young boys can be compared to being “clothed in clothes of death” in the Songs of Experience. In the Songs of Experience, the chimney sweeper detects the ill intentions of the society with a sense of realization that they are not welcome in the society. The little boy happiness is perceived by his parents as a sign of contentment that makes them feel that they did nothing wrong by selling them out. The little boy is reduced to a sad child who has to endure the hardship of life as a chimney sweeper and believes that his death will be an onset of a better

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