Analysis Of The Silence By Joseph J. Ellis

Superior Essays
Throughout this all-encompassing novel, Joseph J. Ellis is depicting what truly happened in prominent political events rather than the common ideas. He extensively goes into great depths rather than merely scraping the surface of these phenomenal affairs. Specifically, he elaborates on events such as the Duel between Hamilton and Burr, The Compromise of 1790, the plague of slavery, George Washington 's presidency, and the rocky friendship between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. It is more than apparent that Ellis wrote this novel to provide great insight as to what really occurred on some of the most monumental days of American History.

On a July morning of 1804, renowned politicians Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton met near the modern-day
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Joseph Ellis emphasizes that rather than tackling this situation head-on, congress shunned this issue to avoid upsetting the southern states. While many prominent political figures knew and understood that slavery was wrong, they also knew that if they openly opposed it, the southern states would be furious. The Quakers sent in a petition to end slavery and it was even approved by Benjamin Franklin. Southern states, such as Georgia and South Carolina, were not happy that this petition was even considered. I find it interesting how the title of this chapter (The Silence) powerfully conveys how no action whatsoever was taken against slavery regardless of congress knowing it to be wrong. Rather than taking affirmative action, they remained in …show more content…
He did not make any contact whatsoever with Jefferson because he felt completely back stabbed. Ellis evokes the idea that Adams believed Jefferson would be remembered as a prominently monumental figure but felt he was extremely undeserving of it. After a long series of letters between the two, they reconcile beautifully. They correspond over essential matter such as slavery, human nature, and even life after death. Eventually, just as the dream of Benjamin Rush predicted, they amiably and nearly concurrently pass

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