The Significance Of Candy In Of Mice And Men By John Steinbeck

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The significance of Candy in of Mice and Men
Candy is a significant character in the novella ‘Of Mice and Men’, written by John Steinbeck in many different ways. Candy is "a tall, stoop-shouldered old man... . He was dressed in blue jeans and carried a big push-broom in his left hand." He is a good example of many themes that are expressed throughout the book such as loneliness, friendship and powerlessness; he also gives us an insight from a different perspective.
The main relationship that Candy has within the book is one with his dog, who mirrors him in mannerism, age and appearance. This is shown when the dog is about to be killed by Carlson who describes him as “old” that “he’s stiff with rheumatism” and that “he’s not good to you, Candy.
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Now the owners of the ranch, the boss and Curley, keep him on as long as he can "swamp" out or clean the bunkhouse. This shows how the working conditions were not up to standard to save money but the migrant workers would still come as it was during the depression after the Wall Street crash. This is so that he will not sue them for health and safety Candy gives Steinbeck an opportunity to discuss social discrimination based on age and handicaps. Candy represents what happens to everyone who gets old in American society: they get “canned”. This shows how in American society only the young and fit had purpose to the rebuilding of the economy. As Candy has not been sacked or “canned” it shows that because he has a disability he was treated differently making him different and an outsider, increasing the …show more content…
He portrays the idea that without a friend in the world then you are alone. This is enforced when Slim says that maybe everyone is scared of each other as most migrant workers travel alone and don’t trust others. Candy shows the reader how important Lennie is to George when his dog dies as this foreshadows Lennie’s death. This happens but Candy knowing that he being killed is best for the dog; this is the same with George knowing that Lennie has to be killed as it is the only way to save Lennie from the others. Candy’s reaction is also a preview of how George acts when Lennie is killed: quiet, sad and sober. This shows that Candy and George both want the best for their friends, the dog and Lennie, because otherwise they wouldn’t have done what they did. This was all out of love and kindness for the

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