Feminism In Mary Wollstonecraft's Home

Great Essays
“One is not born, but rather becomes woman. No biological, psychological or economic fate determines the figure that the female presents in a society; it is civilization as a whole that produces this creature…which is described as feminine” (Simon de Beauvoir301) the pathetic condition of women in all over the world forced Simon de Beauvoir to expose their marginalized status in her celebrated book, “The second sex”. Mary Wollstonecraft in” A vindication of the right of women” (1792) also throws light on her intense urge to make women free and independent. She opines, “I do not wish them (women) to have power over men, but over themselves, (Wollstonecraft 81). If we talk about the condition of woman in India, than it is equally miserable, …show more content…
She has portrayed the numerous schemes developed by the patriarchs to curb female freedom and independence. The third novel HOME which deals with the plight of women in a joint family and how that joint family plays havoc in their life. Home is the story of middle class family in Karol Bag of Delhi who has come from Pakistan after independence. The story which explores the complex terrain of the Indian family and reveals many issues that are deep rooted within the family. The Indian women are always expected to follow the illustration of sita, savitri and gandhari. But the noticeable point is that these ideal women existed only in epics. They were princesses and queens and were much far from the pains and sufferings of the woman in the modern world who doesn’t even have an identity of her own. She lives for others and breathes for others. The female protagonists of the Indian novels are mostly educated, aspiring individuals caged within confines of a conservative society. Their education leads them to independent thinking for which their family and society become intolerant of them. They struggle between tradition and modernity. It is their individual struggle with family and society, through which they plunge into a dedicated effort to carve an identity for themselves as qualified women with faultless backgrounds. The novel HOME revolves around the same

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Shashi Deshpande has dealt with the predicament of the modern educated women in the traditional society. According to R. S. Pathak : ´´ Shashi Deshpande deals with the middle – class Indian woman who represents the overwhelming majority of Indian women and is struggling to adjust in it rather than get free from the traditional world.´´ (4) Shashi Deshpande´s leading women characters of her novels are educated, intelligent, professional and understanding women. They recognise and understand the new roles which they want to perform in the new world. Her female characters as wife, mother and daughter tries to…

    • 3092 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Veena Sheshadri says in her review: Why has the author chosen a “heroine” who only succeeds in evoking waves of irritation in the reader? Perhaps it is because a competent writer like her is never satisfied unless she is tackling new challenges. Also, she believes in presenting life as it is and not as it should be; and there must be thousands of self-centered women like Jaya, perennially griping about their fate, but unwilling to do anything that could result in their being tossed out of their comfortable ruts in to the big, bad world of reality, to fend for themselves. (Deshpande,…

    • 1619 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Devi’s mother Sita stands for feminine mothers who love to perform matron role with all gratitude. Sita’s whole life has been devoted to the up keeping of her social position in Indian Society. The story of these two doesn’t conform to the same values yet Devi at the end realizes her mother’s own difficult life choices in the past. Sita allows her daughter to study in abroad where Devi finds bewildering freedom, has given all intimate relations to her black boyfriend whom she never sees perfect husband. As soon as returning home, Devi finds herself drifting into arranged marriage settled by her mother.…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    She has treated the everyday common and ordinary experiences through which a middle class women is going. A middle class working women is her protagonist of every novel. Deshpande’s protagonists of novel are stronger for they attempt to resolve their problems by a process of temporary withdrawal from their traditional assigned role. Shashi Deshpande is one of the novelists whom you can read with seriousness shashi Deshpande is a well known name in the field of Indian literature. She pursued her education in Dharwad, Bombay and Bangalore.…

    • 974 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    A community of women became a key aspect of feminism “Without community, there is no liberation, only the most vulnerable and temporary armistice between an individual and her oppression” (Audre Lorde page 333). From this point onward feminism would never again try to be exclusive but attempt to be as inclusive as possible. In doing so they hoped to create even greater unity among women and for women to begin thinking of themselves as women just as much as they thought of themselves as black or white. Feminism, particularly third wave feminism, began talking about the problems faced by people who couldn’t identify with The Feminine Mystique. With the rise of girl power movements feminism became even more inclusive and all…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    These reactions to Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, exemplify the expectations and roles of women in society during the 19th century. The severe backlash upon the work illuminated the way in which society trained people not only to see woman but society. Women were the second sex, not respected or even see as human but rather dealt with as a plaything. Ibsen through language, scenery, and characters’ actions demonstrates a woman’s place in the world. A world where a woman’s identity and validation can only be found by what she is to her husband and children and even that is highly insignificant, for like any other broken doll she could be just as easily replaced with a newer prettier version.…

    • 1962 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Thus, therefore the problems of women are the central theme of maximum woman writers. It is quiet natural to expose the problems of individual viewing is the universal point of view. A women’s attempt to self discovery leads to interrogate that she has not been only born as a woman but she becomes one as, she is hardly a product of socio- cultured environment in the making of which she has any…

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Austen’s work was part of her feminism act, to make women aware about the limit power of the women in England. The importance of marriage for both genders, men or female, both seek marriage. As for Jane Austen she was never married and decided to be writer. In her books show the importance of marriage and manners. Works Cited page 1.…

    • 1787 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Her novels present a ceaseless quest for a meaningful life by educated, sensitive woman. In Desai‟s novels the rejection in childhood or over-pampering creates psychological blocks in the way of maturity and healthy interpersonal relationship in adult life. In her novels the girl marry because of her parents wishes and latter on judges her husband according to her intellect and find him inadequate and takes her own path (suicide) by Maya. The theme has been as old as the novel itself and can be found in Richardson and Fielding, D.H. Lawerence, Virginia Woolf, Hemingway and…

    • 4751 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Women in the twentieth century lived an age characterized by gender inequality as they were expected to remain subservient to their husbands and to carry out particular social expectations such as marriage, having children and not pursuing a career. Women writers, have learned to grow out of these societal expectations by finding their own voice, embodying a feminist point of view. Alice Walker, Adrienne Rich and Miles Franklin are all examples of women writers who have surpassed societal expectations by writing stories about what it means to be a woman. Firstly, I will introduce Rich’s essay, Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence by exploring the concept in its entirety and secondly, examine how various practices of compulsory…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays