Who Is Jane Austen's Emma?

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The novel, Emma, by Jane Austen tells the story of Emma Woodhouse and the love drama in the small village of Highbury. It takes place in the early nineteenth century England, where the young adults of this town are looking for suitable spouses. Emma finds herself meddling in the love affairs of Ms. Harriet Smith and matching making a potential suitor to a sweet, candid but rather dense lady. Contrary to Harriet, Emma is an intelligent, pretty and well-a-do empress of Highbury’s social scene, with no plans of becoming a bachelorette. Interested in preserving her independence, she consciously realizes the privileges of being the youngest daughter of gentleman. The novel takes on the challenges of rigid class society based on wealth and the it’s …show more content…
There are rules, guidelines and social structure to appeal to. One must not marry below or above their social status but rather reach for a partner that was equivocal in wealth and class to defer any future hardship. As the Austen is noted for sharp tongue and strong use of irony, Harriet to much dismay of Emma is actually a daughter of a tradesman and is well-suited to Mr. Robert Martin. After Emma had been pushing Harriet to falling in love with Mr. Elton, Mr. Elton confesses his love for Emma. In hindsight, Emma see the superficiality of Mr. Elton’s Marriage has a lot to do with money in Austen wanted to portray the importance of how the sanctity of marriage should be kept between two people that genuinely love each other. It was climbing up the social ladder that women rarely achieved on their own merit. Marriage was about the right relations, the right connections that could bring happiness, because people who have food and nice clothes are happy and have money. Emma gained her independence and security from her family 's fortune. In the beginning of the book, it seems as getting married would strip Emma of her independence, thus making her subservient to her husband 's needs and wants. Woman of a lower social class would require the dependency of a husband to provide a living for herself and her family. The complications in marriage shows Austen 's …show more content…
Known for its sensibility and satire of the English society, the story is very relatable to high school students as it almost becomes a coming of age story. Emma is maturing through all of the dramatic instances in the book and learns basically the voices of her conscience and her impulses. She also realizes there is more complexity and substance in every situation and person. She has the same know-it-all spirit that many teenagers can relate to having and the reader even picks up that same pride. The pride that the reader is better than Emma because the reader would not have ever gotten into other people 's business and the reader would have been more careful. Here the reader gets lost in their pride, that the perception of the actual story is muddled and the novel becomes more cunning than murder

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