The Importance Of The First Great Awakening By Jonathan Edwards

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The First Great Awakening was a series of religious turbulences throughout North America. The Great Awakening was a reaction to the diminishing of Calvinist beliefs in the colonies as the beliefs of Rationalism and Deism were on the rise. The First Great Awakening was mostly associated with the Protestant preacher Jonathan Edwards. Jonathan Edwards essentially believed that all humans were inherent sinners and that we are all sinners in the hands of an Angry God. Edwards preached highly emotional sermons that were built on principles found in Calvinism, he believed that the only way to decide where you were to end up in the afterlife was to surrender entirely to God's will and to reform behavior. Because he believed we were not predestined …show more content…
Whitefield was a founder of Methodism which is an evangelical form of Protestantism, he believed in preaching by unordained ministers and was extremely devoted to the salvation of the common people. Whitefield was able to spread his sermons throughout the colonies on newspapers and other forms of similar types of marketing and commercial networks. Whitefield and Tennant were quite different, Whitefield preached discipline, morality, and harmony, while Tennent radicalized the conservative movement by attacking the clergy and created many conflicts over New Lights and Old Lights. The impact of the First Great Awakening was seen mainly in the way Lay preachers, which were typically women or Native-Americans, annihilated elite white men's jurisdiction over religious speech. There were also major disputes involving ministerial duty. Many people also now felt that their beliefs could now be different than those that were deemed as their social superior. The Great Awakening also changed the bonds and feelings between entire communities as well as individuals and families, it also changed entire societal …show more content…
This meeting evoked intense feelings of religious enthusiasm, which is how it actually got its name. The Second Awakening is known as the Protestant movement of the early 1800s and it greatly increased church attendance as well as leading to several different social reforms. This movement also got many more citizens to attend church, prior to the movement less than four percent of people attended church, but during and after the movement more than triple that amount began to attend church. Citizens during this time were allowed to attend and pay the church that they believed aligned most with their religious beliefs and methods, there was overall much more religious freedom. Evangelical Christians believed that all humans were capable of salvation, but it was up to the individual. In order to reach salvation each and every single person had to accept God's grace in an act of free will, or in other words do so on their own term without being forced. The Second Great Awakening was also largely focused on perfectionism, which is when a person can conquer sin within herself as a type of self-transformation. Lay speakers, as well as ordained ministers both, did everything they could to reach individual souls of every single person. One of the most important people in the Second Great Awakening was Charles Grandison Finney, who believed that

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