Working Conditions In Labor Unions

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A trade union or better known as a, labor union, is an association of workers fighting to improve safety benchmarks, acquire benefits and higher pay, and gain better working conditions. During the period of 1840s and 1850s, working conditions were suboptimal. Factory owners abused their workers in a variety of ways. Factory owners employed children, severely underpaid their workers, and had no regard for the safety of their workers. Workers sought to create better conditions in the labor market because of the constant abuses of factory owners.
During this time period, laborers fought to attain justice in their employment for social change. They sought to increase wages, improve working conditions, receive better hours and fight tooth and nail
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After the civil war, the industrialization of the US economy commenced. This meant that a greater number of people were working in places and factories that large companies owned opposed to them working for themselves in their own small business. As well, many people were assimilating into the US as immigrants, which in turn created less jobs for the American citizen. The American Federation of Labor (AFL) represented all workers, regardless of race, skill, nationality, gender, or religion. However, the unions that established the AFL only constituted the skilled trades. As extensive advances in technology began to mar the original way of production, multiple unions neared towards an industrial based structure. Usually skill lines tended to hire by racial, ethnic, and gender divisions, the labor union movement took on a racist and sex based composition as well. In 1902, blacks made up about 3 percent of workers and in the case of women immigrants, a similar devolution occurred. The multitude of immigrants caused labor prices and the quality of working conditions so decline sporadically. Meanwhile pay had been already low and working conditions were subpar. Likewise, ex slaves that had insufficient working experience in factories also generally received lower wages. These factors combined to make many workers unhappy with their station in life. Workers fought for the best deal for them and thought that labor unions were an effective way to achieve that. Labor unions …show more content…
In turn worker’s wages, the conditions at work, and their hours all ameliorated. Factors that contributed to the formation of labor unions are how laborers fought intensely for social change in the workplace through racial struggles, how ideas greatly influenced the formation of labor unions, and how unions caused mass industrialization; if these events never occurred, the workplace could still have been an abusive

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