Psychological Addiction Essay

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Intro What is addiction? When a person takes drugs “they enter the brain, and it disrupts the normal processing of the brain” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 51). These changes are “considered maladaptive and will lead to addiction” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 51). Neuroscience studies have been conducted and concluded that; “addiction is a disease that affects both the mind and body” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 51). Well look at the difference between psychological and physical addiction in relation to tranquilizers.
Psychological Addiction Psychological addiction deals with how drugs affect a person’s mind. Research has proven that “drug abuse changes the brains chemistry” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 52). Addiction is also “considered a disease of the brain” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 52). Psychological dependence is the “need to use a drug to relieve negative emotions” (Meyer, pg. 109). A person may “spend a great deal of time in activities necessary to obtain and use the drug” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 52). Psychological addiction “almost always occurs within the context of other problems” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 126).
Physical Addiction Physical dependence differs from psychological dependence in how it presents. Physical dependence is actual physical signs of withdrawal. Physical
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339). Secondary prevention is for those who have used and may use more if not redirected to limit their use or stop altogether” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 339). Tertiary prevention is for those who are at a “level of dependence and abuse” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 339). One step community prevention has taken is “the implementation of case workers who oversee people at risk” (Stevens & Smith, pg. 345). Case workers would provide advocacy for family services like coping skills management, substance abuse and mental health treatment referrals for people who are at risk” (Stevens & Smith, pg.

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