Origin Of Standardized Testing

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The Standard
In today’s society, standards are set all throughout our daily lives. Things such as ensuring that the person we choose to marry isn 't a slob is a perfect example of standards we may set for ourselves. With these self-established standards also comes standards that are set for us. One’s job might hold its employees to a certain standard or a professor might hold a standard for her student to consistently do well in the class. But although standards that are set can be used to bring the best out of a person, such as someone setting high standards for themselves but it can also sometimes unmask our heavy nonchalance. Through many mediums and pathways, this concept and expectations of standards set reaches even throughout the walls
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We can begin with the originators of massive American standardized testing, the College entrance education board. The College Entrance Education Board or CEEB, currently known as “the College Board” is a monopoly that began operation in the year 1900 that is focused on the accessible higher learning for students across America (college Board). The CEEB created tests such as the ACT and SAT and different curriculum for schools all over the U.S. By 1901 the College Board had already administered its first focused test across that could that were focused on nine different subjects. In the year 1916 the College Board began to develop the first examinations that focused on a student 's comprehension. According to Paulina Alcocer, an intern at the National Education Association, within thirty-two years, “1,300 achievement tests were on the market, as compared to about four hundred tests of ‘mental capacities." ninety-two High school tests, vocational tests, assessments of athletic ability, and a variety of miscellaneous tests are developed to supplement the intelligence tests” (Alcocer). These tests were first used to as devices for sorting and classifying students and figuring out what they lacked and what subjects they needed to improve in. With the popularity of these tests growing in the 1900’s, it made schools across America wonder about the benefits and …show more content…
The base concept of testing is great; a way to help our students excel and improve the quality of education in the U.S. but with this good idea came what some believe as bad execution of this concept. With the issues that come with this topic, it is fair to say that standardized testing has had a negative effect on the well being of students today. Based on responses from students and facts on the matter, i believe improvements definitely needs to be made to our education system. Although this controversy may never go away till there are major changes to our education and whether one chooses either side of the argument, one idea remains true, the well-being of the student should come first in all choice made and although there should be high standards set for students, school is not one standard fits

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