The Conflict In Northern Ireland's Troubles

Amazing Essays
The conflict between Israelis and Palestinians over territorialism and the establishment of a Jewish land and that of “the Troubles” in Northern Ireland between the largely Catholic Nationalists and the majority Protestant Unionists have many key similarities. Both “Northern Ireland the State of Israel emerged out of war, the breakup of empires, and international agreements.”1 (ESEP 93)The main phase of both the Northern Ireland conflict and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict occurred around mid 1960s to late 1990s and both had similar grievances around territory and identity. Asymmetrical, sectarian disputes arose over inequalities in political power, access to economic resources, ethnic and cultural identity, and territory disputes. In Northern …show more content…
The beginnings of the Northern Ireland conflict stemmed from the Government of Ireland Act in 1920 that partitioned Southern Ireland and the six counties that make up Northern Ireland. Southern Ireland was under Home Rule by a parliament located in Belfast while the latter was under British jurisdiction. This division was purely a political act rather than one based on geography.”Ulster 's boundaries were drawn to ensure the creation of a Northern state with a decisive, in-built Protestant and Unionist majority.”4 (NI13) This mainly-unionist parliament and union-dominated citizenship led to systematic, institutional discrimination against the Catholics and Nationalists. In addition, a series of treaties around the 1920s also increased violence and led to the development of guerrilla wars of independence and an Irish Republican Army (IRA) campaign. These conflict escalated to levels of civil war, where “over 550 people, mainly Catholics.5 (BCFP152) The Special Powers Act passed in 1922, further granting the state with draconian “emergency” powers which led to the incarceration of 500 Catholics without trial later that year. The Union-dominated government relied on intimidation and the continued suppression of the Nationalist population, which eventually led to the working-class revolts. Student radicalism spread from the civil right movement in America to Europe, inspiring the catholic middle-class to seek redress and demand elementary human rights. The Unionist government 's decision to retaliate with force led the conflict to spread throughout the province, leading to widespread rioting. This campaign for equal rights led to the feeling that the unionist dominance of Northern Ireland was under threat

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    His final months in office were left marked in blood, as his paranoia for internal collapse grew, it ricocheted in his attempts to interfere with international affairs. His attempt to assassinate long time opponent, president Romulo Betancourt of Venezuela, via car bombing was the final straw internationally. It lead to a sanction of 75% of all imports and exports to the nation. (U.S DoS). Meanwhile Trujillo arrested the two foreign bishops within the nation Bishop Panal and Bishop Riley of San Juan De La Maguana (Betances 43), after they held masses in which they lashed out against Trujillo and demanded the calls of the church be answered and the people’s rights respected.…

    • 1212 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Evaluate to what extent the competing ideologies in 20th century Ireland could cause conflict. Firstly, contrasting ideologies are likely to cause conflict due to the differing nature of their key features. A key factor still contributing to the tension prevailing in Ireland today is the contrasting placement of loyalty between Unionists and Nationalists. Ulster Unionist, who comprise almost exclusively of Protestants, place their loyalty to the British government and have demonstrated their loyalty and belief that Northern Ireland should re, a part of Great Britain through the signing of the Ulster Covenant in 1912 and consequent strike in retaliation of the Sunningdale agreement in 1973. The other ideology that exists mainly, but not exclusively…

    • 871 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Palestinian Nationalism

    • 1763 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Palestinians were mostly divided into two ideological camps, splitting into those who identified with Arab nationalism and others who saw themselves as part of the Syrian identity. However, as Gelvin argues, British colonialist policies exacerbated internal fissures in the Arab community and made it difficult for Arab nationalism or Syrian nationalism to serve as a viable option for Palestinians. The mandate system physically (and arbitrarily, with strokes of ink) divided Palestine from Syria which served as the nail in the coffin of Syrian nationalism in Palestine. The drawing of new borders fed into this trend of Palestinian nationalism as Palestine was now an entity on the map which represented a step towards imagining it (Bsheer, 2 Nov). In addition, since Syria was put under the supervision of the French and the British controlled Palestine, citizens from both Arab countries followed different models, which created a further ideological wedge.…

    • 1763 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    British Rule In Ireland

    • 1687 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Once Ireland got its independence in 1922. The Northern Part of the country became separate and remained part of of the UK. There was a great amount of violence there because of the Catholic Nationalist and the Protestant extremists, up until The Good Friday Agreements in 1998 (“Irish”). The United Kingdom at this time was becoming a Protestant country, and Ireland had been mainly Catholic before Britain. The two different religions had issues ever since Protestant started in England.…

    • 1687 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Troubles began because Northern Ireland was divided between the Protestant unionists and the Roman Catholic nationalists. The unionists wanted to remain part of United Kingdom while the nationalists wanted to join the Republic of Ireland. The Catholic in Ireland felt discriminated against by the Protestant majority who made up most of parliament. The conflict began in 1968 and ended in 1998. First, Irish people rioted against British rule, and eventually parted from them creating the Republic of Ireland.…

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Because of the backlash against this law and the counterrevolution in the Vendée region of France, the government began to create harsher punishments for what they considered to be treason. As many as 40,000 people were killed during the Reign of Terror, including the king, Louis XVI, and his wife, Marie Antoinette. However, most of the victims of the Reign of Terror were peasants, the very people the French Revolution was intended to help. The picture…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the following essay I will claim that the Arab-Israeli conflict has been one of the central themes in Middle East politics since 1948. The creation of the state of Israel and subsequent claims of territory has been the cause of many wars in the region. The displacement of the Palestinian population has caused resentment among the Palestinians and aggravated neighbouring states that were the recipients of the displaced populace. Backing by the imperial power of the United States of America only further serves to frustrate the region as it is forced to deal with the imposition of a state the Arab nations all voted against. The state of Israel is the fulcrum in a much larger debate concerning nationalism – Arab nationalism (Pan-Arabism) and Jewish nationalism (Zionism).…

    • 773 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Between 1763 and 1776 political, economical, and military issues set the pace for a brutal, demanding war for both the British and the Colonists. The multitude of political contentions between the Colonists and the British Government was inordinate. For example, the Stamp Act was passed by British Parliament in 1765, which demanded the Colonists to pay taxes on every legal document purchased, therefore paying for British soldiers to remain stationed throughout the colonies. Furiously, the colonists responded by boycotting British merchandise, and riots in the streets. Another example of the political vendetta was a result of British Parliament enactment of the Townshend Act in 1767.…

    • 572 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    State Contestation Analysis

    • 2585 Words
    • 11 Pages

    The majority being the predominantly protestant Unionists, who wish for Northern Ireland to remain a part of the UK, and the Catholic Nationalists, who wish for Northern and Southern Ireland united. In this example, the state being contested was (between 1921 and 1972) the Unionist controlled Northern Irish government, and from 1972 to 1998, the British government, who directly governed NI during this period. The presence of the British Army during this period was representative of the British control over Northern Ireland and became a focus of resentment and hostility, largely by the nationalists, but also by the…

    • 2585 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The 1798 Rebellion

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The political context within Ireland itself remains an important element in the origins of the 1798 rebellion. An address from the United Irishmen to the English society, in 1792, describes the state with regard to the Catholics, declaring three million ‘are taxed without being represented, and bound by laws to which they have not given consent’. Political power in the hands of the Anglican landowners and aristocrats, excluded the majority of the population. The population of Ulster consisted mostly of Presbyterians and outside Dublin, the majority of Irish were Catholic. In order to assert their rule, the British class created a complex religious divide across both class(economic?)…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays