Purpose Of The Irish Republican Army (IRA)

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Chapter 1: Introduction
1.1 General Background (Framework):
The Irish Republican Army, or IRA, fought the English rule over Northern Ireland in the twentieth century and aimed to unite Northern Ireland with Southern Ireland to form the Republic Ireland. It stemmed from the times of William of Orange in 1690, where William’s Protestant Army defeated Catholic King James II in the Battle of the Boyne[1]. In the years leading up to 1703, thousands of Catholics were deported and relocated to live in new areas. English Protestants seized land and owned 90% of the land in Ireland in 1703, which the Catholic peasants had to pay rent for. Many laws were passed from 1695 to 1728 against the Catholics such as the prevention of owning expensive goods, joining the military, having legal jobs and public and
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Some primary sources such as the accounts of soldiers and citizens that lived in Northern Ireland from the 1960s to the 1990s in the form of diaries and letters, though limited in number, can be used in order to deduce the main repercussions of the PIRA’s violence. Books and journals will also be used to provide a reliable source of information on the whole process and the factors surrounding the PIRA’s policies.

1.6 Scope of Research / Delimitation(s):
The background factors of the social situation in Northern Ireland from the 1600s and the political scene in the 1910s to identify the motives for the founding of the IRA will be researched upon. The actions of the PIRA will be considered to identify the severity of impacts in each individual aspect from 1919, when the IRA was founded, to 1994, when the ceasefire was called from the PIRA's bombing campaign, while the aims of the IRA in relation to the PIRA's actions will be used in determining if the PIRA's actions were justified. 1.7 Significance of Research /

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