The Black Death

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From 1347 to 1350, one of the world’s worst epidemics in human history struck Europe, the great plague that caused enough pestilence and death that claimed roughly half of Europe’s population was called the Black Death. Until recently, the Black Death has been widely believed to be a large outbreak of the bubonic plague as some historians challenge this original view. The origins of the black death is still unclear as there are many viewpoints of this plague such as: some believe that the Black Death originated in China or Central Asia and spread to south-east Europe, while others believe that it was an endemic that started in Crimea, and another viewpoint held by a couple of scientist believe the black death was in fact a viral hemorrhagic …show more content…
The scarce resource of food and grain attract a larger number of rodents as the stockpiles of food shrunk while the population of rodents grew. The Great Famine also contributed to an increase of land tax as many historians suspect that wealthy lords tried to increase their income as the cost of buying food has sky rocketed since the beginning of the famine. In turn, the increase of land tax led to poor living conditions because many of the common people may not have been able to afford maintaining their homes. The most important condition that spread the Black Death was the black rats that carried the fleas, which were infected with the disease. The pervious stated conditions of the decline in predator against the rats and ill-maintained living quarters, both contributed to the boom of the rodent population and ultimately a possible increase in the flea population, but most likely rat population spread out around Europe taking the fleas with them. By looking at the conditions, I believe that the Black Death could reoccur because even though the living conditions in modern day society has drastically improved over the centuries, people often overlook that those conditions still remain in the second and third world …show more content…
It has taken Europe roughly a century and a half to recover from the huge drop in population (Kelly, 2005). The largest effect the plague had was against the Catholic Church because the priests of the church often housed and treated the diseased people. The plague spread amongst the church’s holy men more rapidly than any other organization of the time. In turn, the massive deaths of the members of the church caused a widespread persecution that was targeted against minorities such as the Jewish, foreign people, lepers, and the poor. I believe that anyone would agree that the Black Death played a large part in the history of Europe as the plague has had reoccurred many times after the Black Death has passed and has crippled European populations and

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