Essay On The Great Barrier Reef

Good Essays
Off the Northeast coast of Australia, a line of surf rises above the pacific ocean. Beneath the water’s surface, creating breaking waves, is the most magical marine environment on earth, the Great Barrier Reef. It is a place that is unique and considered one of the world’s seven wonders. The GBR stretches for thousands of miles and is considered the largest living structure on the planet. The reef is made up of three thousand different reefs that allows for the GBR to host the most life in this area than anywhere on the planet. Most of the life here is beautiful, while some look straight out of science fiction, and others down right deadly. The GBR is an amazing ever changing natural miracle. With the most diverse marine life, it always seems to be as busy as a never ending rush hour throughout the reef. The GBR is so massive it is the only living structure that is visible from space. High temperature is having negative affect on the GBR causing destruction. The Great Barrier Reef is under threat from the most widespread, rapid and damaging set of industrial developments in Australia’s history. The Australian Government is fast-tracking dredging and dumping of millions of tons of seabed and rock, and encouraging increased shipping through the narrow straits between reefs. Many of …show more content…
I would like to discuss what beauty of life resides there, as well as what the current status of that life there is. I want to hit main points of status of the Great Barrier Reef, climate change, warmer ocean temperatures, bleaching of the coral reefs, contaminates from river run off, and human touring affects. Most of the Reef is part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and various parts of it are protected in certain ways. In example, fishing is restricted in some areas and particular animals like dolphins, whales, and green turtles are

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Hawaii Essay

    • 1368 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The system had obtained equity investment of $10.7 million and was fertilizing the design. Hilo is located on Hilo Bay on the eastern side of the island of Hawaii, 216 miles southeast of Honolulu (on the island of Oahu). The area 's topography is mostly sloping, from the tops of the scenic Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa mountains to the sea. Hilo is located less than 30 miles from Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes on earth, which has been emitting lava since 1983. Lava flows have been responsible for the destruction of nearly 200 homes since then, and they continue to menace the island.…

    • 1368 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Great Barrier Reef Essay

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Biodiversity Essay How can the great barrier reef be protected for the future generation? The great barrier reef is a stunning 2,600 km stretch of some of the most amazing coral reefs in the world. It is so big it is visible from space. The reef is approximately the same area as Japan, Malaysia or even Germany(Great Barrier Reef). It is a huge part of the world but also a huge part of people's lives.…

    • 1029 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The reef contains many different life forms such as: fish, sea turtles, giant clams, sea snakes, nudibranch, stingray, sharks, seahorses, and numerous other species. The Great Barrier Reef also provides support to the ecosystem through its ability to form coral and allow other marine life to live among the coral. The reef is threatened through climate change. With rising temperatures the coral becomes stressed which leads to coral bleaching. The beautiful reef is an important contributor to the ocean’s ecosystem.…

    • 1309 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ecosystems: Coral Reefs

    • 880 Words
    • 4 Pages

    This reef is made up of over 2,900 individual reef and 900 islands. Now that’s huge! Its stretches over 2600 kilometers off the northeast coast of Australia. There are 10 main coral reefs that are very large in size besides the reef I already mentioned. I already spoke of the biggest one which is the Great Barrier Reef (Australia).…

    • 880 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In 2004 the Indian Ocean coastline at Sumatra, Indonesia was struck by a devastatingly high magnitude earthquake. The earthquake, which was said to have released the energy of roughly 23,000 Hiroshima style bombs, triggered a tsunami that followed shortly after (Nation Geographic 1). The Tsunami that followed caused mass destruction and is actually considered one of the deadliest natural disasters to ever be recorded (Taylor 1). This Tsunami, known as the 2004 Indonesian Tsunami, struck on December 26 at around 7:58 a.m. tore through and obliterated most of the coastline (Figure 1.1) (Tsunami Devastates 1). It is a notable Tsunami because it had been triggered by the largest earthquake in 40 years and is now considered one of the most destructive,…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Oceanic Impact For as far back as humankind can remember, Oceans have been a major part of our livelihood. Oceans cover nearly 71% of the Earth’s surface along with marginal seas, and land comprises the other 29%. Humans have always been fascinated with Oceans for their beauty, size, and great uncertainty. To date, it is believed that only 9% of all oceanic life forms have been discovered, which leaves millions of unidentified plants and sea life still out there. Aside from the sheer admiration, humans have figured out just how valuable the Ocean is to our well-being and survival.…

    • 1052 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Great Barrier reef is a popular tourist destination because it has some of the most pristine waters in the country. Also it has one of the world's largest coral reefs.. Currently , 80% of the rubbish that is dumped in the reef are materials such as dirt,mud,sand,grass,plastic and foam. Plastic is one of the biggest ocean species killer. The animal assumes…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Why Do Volcanoes Occur

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Many of the eruptions have occurred in these shore lines of the Pacific Ocean throughout history. In August of 1833 Indonesia a volcano blew itself into pieces creating the loudest sound recorded into history. In June of 1991 Philippines a volcano blasted 22 miles of debris into the air. In May 1980 Mount St. Helen caused 1 billion dollars of damage. It’s so important for scientist to find the sources that power these volcanoes to erupt to see how it could be either prevented or allow proper evacuation.…

    • 910 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Japan Earthquake 2011

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages

    On March 11, 2011, the biggest earthquake in Japanese history took place. The sudden release of pressure caused a six-meter-deep mass of water to move upward toward the surface of the sea. As it collapsed back, immense waves raced across the ocean. These waves were not like normal waves but like shock waves from an explosion. Although these waves were only a meter high, they were one-hundred kilometers front to back, traveling at terrifying speeds.…

    • 2037 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Human influenced processes of destruction towards the Heart Reef The Heart Reef is suffering from severe coral bleaching as a result of increased water temperature, as well as the limestone reef structures loosing formation because of ocean acidification, and damage to the reef due to bad weather conditions like flooding and cyclones. These issues are mainly from Global Climate Change, which has so many terrible effects on reefs. Sedimentation/Siltation- Natural processes of destruction towards the Heart Reef Agriculture and construction sites are eroding away, and this creates high levels of silt (such as fine sand and clay) in waterways. This prevents new coral colonies forming and stops old coral from re-colonizing, decreases water quality, and stops light getting through to smaller plants that need light to survive. Sustainability Will the Heart Reef still be there for our children to enjoy?…

    • 996 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays