Fragility And Interconnectedness In Ceremony By Leslie Marmon Silko

Great Essays
In the book Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko, fragility and interconnectedness is a topic that is brought up a few times. In Ceremony, Ku’oosh, the medicine man talks about fragility and how everything is interconnected; when one element is impacted, the rest of the environment is impacted as well. Fragility is something that is not only related to Tayo, the main character, and the struggles he is going through post-war, but it is also related to society today. Today in society, fragility and interconnectedness is most commonly seen in ecosystems. There are two examples that represent fragility and interconnectedness in society today. The two examples are the Great Barrier Reef and the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. …show more content…
This relates to the re-introduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. In the article, “1995 Reintroduction of Wolves in Yellowstone,” the author says that wolves were absent from the national park for 70 years. The wolves were absent from Yellowstone because the last pack was killed. During the absence of the wolves, the ecosystem began to change. The elk population increased drastically and the elk grazed across the landscape killing young brush and trees. The article says, “As early as the 1930s, scientists were alarmed by the degradation and were worried about erosion and plants dying off.” This shows that the environment was negatively impacted by the wolves’ absence. Many people thought that the wolves being absent was a good thing, when it was actually negatively impacting the environment. It was then that Yellowstone began thinking about how they could come up with a solution. The solution to the failing ecosystem was to reintroduce wolves back into the ecosystem. In 1995, eight wolves from a national park in Canada were reintroduced to Yellowstone. In the years following the wolves’ reintroduction, the environment began to …show more content…
The ecosystem in Yellowstone National Park was negatively impacted when the wolves were absent, but when the wolves were reintroduced, the ecosystem ended up flourishing after a few years. The Great Barrier Reef could have a similar experience to this. If scientists find the keystone species that are crucial to the environment of the reef and reintroduce that species, then the Great Barrier Reef could experience a similar change that Yellowstone experienced. If one species is reintroduced to the reef, then a series of changes could follow, which will then end up saving the ecosystem of the Great Barrier Reef all together. However, there are two negatives sides to this solution. One is that scientists may not find a keystone species that can save the Great Barrier Reef which would result in the reef dying. The other is that it could take years for scientists to find the species that will allow this change to happen, and there is a possibility that it may be too late for the Great Barrier Reef to be

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