Dehumanization In The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass

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Dehumanization Versus Deliverance: a Narrative of a Once Silent Man
Enslavement was a catastrophic cataclysm that appeared in many countries and time periods throughout history that divided moralities apart. None more distinguishable than the events taken after the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Copious slaves were trapped in the prejudiced, austere Southern institution until their demise, and other slaves and residents strived for a promised liberty. Frederick Douglass was and influential figure in US history who contributed into the abolition of slavery in the credibility of equality for every individual. He is the author to, “The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,” that divulges the full extent to which the US society was unjust in
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He was born as a young black slave who at first could not read and was abstruse to comprehend the environment he was encompassed in and the world outside of slavery. The simplicities of learning to read by Mrs. Auld were affected as Mr. Auld sought the teachings to be, “unlawful, [and] unsafe/to teach a slave to read” (Douglass 5). In Douglass’ narrative, the tone is first set as that of an observer, nevertheless finishing with his own personal accounts. The eloquent narrative of Frederick Douglass is an influential description of his struggle and belligerence for freedom against the prejudiced, acrimony, and deleterious Southern institution. His motivation to write about his difficult life as a slave was to both inform the American public about the degraded, malevolent nature of slavery and to humanize the slaves negatively affected by the Southern institution. Throughout his narrative, Frederick delineate the horrors of slavery by exposing the candid information that, “led [him] to abhor and detest [his] enslavers” (Douglass 27). Douglass’s narrative inputted examples of the drastic conditions African Americans that targeted an audience for persuasion to declare freedom for the servants. As listeners varied from abolitionists, to …show more content…
After he had passed, Douglass became one of the foremost figures of the abolitionist movement. Douglass' narrative exploits the advantages made in order to abolish slavery, by not only to evince the public on the malevolent, degrading adversity slave drivers loaded on their slaves, but to civilize the slaves that had been negatively affected regarding to the Southern institution of slavery. To embellish every horrific detail, to aid in his fight to abolish slavery, was what helped his objective. This influential narrative parallels Douglass maturing in life through all the struggles to uncover the power and dedication to demand the freedom for himself and all. This document was more than mere propaganda to solely contend in opposition to slavery, it was a testimony of a political purpose to provide abstract queries, with freedom as the subject, to personally define which side of the debate was just. Personally, that was of main importance because Douglass’s purpose was to not attack the beliefs for slavery, but to inform the people of America the brutal lives slaves were suffering and let the views of residents alter. With the depictions of dehumanization and freedom in his prominent narrative, Frederick Douglass succeeded in the voyage of abolishment for all under the slave rule in America; and despite the

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