The Internet And The Internet

1011 Words 4 Pages
People have been so affected by the internet’s web, and have gotten themselves tangled in it. Humanity would be nothing like the way it is today without the internet. I have withdrawals when I don’t have access to the internet, it’s become ingrained into who I am. Nicholas Carr’s essay Is Google Making Us Stupid? provides us with a different viewpoint than our own. Carr, and the people he includes as anecdotes in his essay, are mostly writers. They use the internet for research on a daily basis, and have experienced a ‘falling out’ with reading. They find themselves skimming through writings which they previously would have dove into wholeheartedly, which is very similar to my recent experiences with reading. The internet is akin to many historical …show more content…
You can’t make deep connections if you’re only brushing over an article. Carr makes a poignant statement in his essay about shallow reading, “Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.”. I relate to that quote to an extent. As a child I would spend all of my time reading, I wouldn’t put a book down until I finished it. Now as I’ve grown, I rarely read paper books, I find myself more interested in short writings or excerpts that I can find online. I hardly ever read a complete news article before getting distracted. Efficiency is my, along with many others’, top priority. Get as little information that you need in as little time as possible, then move on to something else. The internet can be a distracting place. Once you start looking at one thing, it can lead you off on a bunny trail of mindless content. You don’t usually stay on one website for very long, moving on to the next website in your daily routine. After a few years of thoughtless browsing, I have had to ask myself if I even enjoyed it. Constant usage of the internet has not benefitted me. Of course the internet has been of great use, for entertainment and research, but being connected constantly was unhealthy, so I put an end to it. I have found that restricting my time online has caused me to start reading and understanding more actual books. Sometimes it takes having to disconnect to …show more content…
It’s harmful to your reading, your writing, and your mind. You’re less likely to retain information when you know you won’t need it off the top of your head, when you can look something up later. Carr paraphrases the main point of 2001: A Space Odyssey into his chilling last sentence. “... as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.”. His concern is perfectly logical, relying on something else’s knowledge instead of our own, your mind begins to reverse its development. You stop making deep connections, you stop processing information for yourself, you start becoming surface level with your knowledge. While a computer can be your biggest blessing during the writing process, it can also be your biggest curse. It has a wealth of information that can be extremely beneficial to a writer. This information is so readily available, but is often just skimmed through and exited out of. When writers had to go to libraries to research, they had to read through and analyze everything themselves, instead of having someone else’s already paraphrased thoughts on the

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