Jane Eyre Epoch

Great Essays
A promising era had risen when Queen Victoria came to throne. The period of the Nineteenth Century was characterized by rapid changes, marked by a great expansion of power and culture. Throughout this century, territorial expansion spread in parts of India, Africa, in the Middle East and in Asia. This process brought not only colonial presence but the increased use of English language outside of Europe, trading, cultural integration, advances in medicine, and technology. Established as the birth of modern times, as it is still considered, the Victorian era in Britain was an age that began with optimism leading to economic boom, and eventually gave away to uncertainty. Families encouraged hard work, respectability and social deference. Nonetheless, …show more content…
Jane Eyre is the story of a suffered young girl, in charge of a cruel aunt who does nothing but mistreat her. Later on, she is taken to Lowood, a school for bad-behaving girls. Meanwhile, she decides to spend for eight more years, six as a student and two as a teacher. Yearning and believing that life was far more than what she had lived, starts working as a governess at Thornfield; where she falls in love with Edward Rochester, the owner. After several events and feelings regarding matters of the heart, which included the day of the wedding, it was revealed that Mr. Rochester was married and that his wife was kept in the house all this time, besides this, Bertha was a mad woman. Jane flees and, at last, is found by three siblings which adopt her. One of them, St. John, finds her a job as well as the opportunity to go to India, as his wife. At this moment, Jane decides to return to Thornfield, who has now been burned by Bertha, though she dies during the incident. Edward has gotten blind, however, they decide to rebuild their relationship. To conclude, she writers that has been married for ten years and that her husband regained his sight and behold his first son. Otherwise, Jane Eyre portrayed a realistic view of life that confirmed the evolution of the era. Victorian novels criticized aspects of society, for instance, child labor and abuse, the role of women, the industrial revolution …show more content…
Writing in the shadow of romanticism, the Victorians developed a poetry of mood and character. Additionally, this drastic changes brought England to its highest point of development as a world power. Conversely, the early Victorian period (1837-46) saw the opening of Britain’s first railway and its first Reform Parliament, but it was also a time of economic distress. Although the mid-period (1847-69) was not free of harassing problems, it was a time of prosperity, optimism, and stability. In the last period (1870-1901) England confronted growing threats to its military and economic preeminence. Literacy increased meaningfully, especially for publishers, since it was more convenient to bring out their material. In the same manner, novels and long works of nonfiction were brought in serial form, attracting a diverse community of readers. Significantly, novels sought to represent a large and comprehensive social world, building the tension between conditions and aspirations of the hero or heroine. Inequalities between genders proposed a debate known as “the Woman Question”. Certainly, the most significant development in publishing was the periodical. British forces worked to expand their global influence. The changes were related; the hardships that the industrial world created, put women into new roles: the formation of the new class

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