Dialogic Talk

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The national curriculum in England for Science (2014) intends that pupils should be able ‘to describe associated processes and key characteristics in common language using technical terminology accurately’ (Scholastic, 2013). Children are required to use discussion to work together to enhance their ideas and address any misconceptions they have. Earle and Serret (2015: 119) have put forward ways in which we as teachers can ‘…encourage children to participate in a science-based dialogue’. We must hook them into the lesson using a stimulus like a giant footprint (Earle and Serret, 2015). We must give children time to think and someone to talk to (Earle and Serret, 2015) using think, pair, share for example. Finally, we must provide a supportive environment a key principle of …show more content…
2011:9). I have done this by looking at the theoretical influences of dialogic teaching and talk, the principles of dialogic talk and ultimately how they contribute to children’s learning. I have critically analysed relationship between dialogic teaching and two of the core subjects in the primary national curriculum: English and Science. As examples from the core subjects show, dialogic talk is a way that children can communicate ideas in English and helps development understanding in Science. Throughout this essay, I have drawn upon my developing professional practice; in light of the experience, I have had as a practitioner to demonstrate the importance of talk as a foundation to learning. Dialogic teaching is vital in the classroom. Teachers should embrace talk to support children’s development in cognitive, social and emotional terms; however, there are barriers to its educational benefits. Not all children in classrooms can access talk; therefore, they will have a different foundation to learn. We as teachers should strive to ensure talk is genuinely

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