The Role Of Technology In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a glimpse into the knowledgeable and ethical implications of science and technology. Shelley has written this novel to foreshadow what is to come with increasing knowledge and access to technology—including the many downsides. Technology from the Romantic Movement has evolved immensely—from finding viable vaccinations and cures for many diseases to inventing computers that fit in the palm of a hand. While the advancement of such technology has greatly improved our world, technology has caused equally as much harm as good. A controversial new aspect of technology is stem cell research, which is the process of contracting out stem cells from embryos and growing them in a laboratory for the purpose of curing …show more content…
When stem cell research first began in 1998, the intentions were pure. The research was initially planned to contract out stem cells from embryos to grow in laboratories for a myriad of beneficial purposes. As time and knowledge advanced, limits were placed on scientific research and its parameters based on the notion that “that destruction of this pre-born life is morally unacceptable” (Pros & Cons of Embryonic Stem Cell Research). People that felt passionately against this, also held that life begins at conception. The words ‘destruction of pre-born life’ would have made Shelley cringe. Shelley did not believe in the concept of destroying one human life to create another. When writing Frankenstein, she showed the potential dismay technology had to offer. It was evident throughout the story that her opinion about using parts of a human to create another human was indecent, hence the insanity the creation casted upon …show more content…
It is evident that Frankenstein is not of the Christian faith or any other denomination which could potentially be the reason behind his downfall. This is proven by the fact that Frankenstein creates this monster with an uncontrollable thirst “but in a scientific pursuit there is continual food for discovery and wonder” (4.2), whereas God created this world with caution and thought. The allusions to religion show Frankenstein’s failure to be a godly figure. Frequent innuendos towards religious role-playing such as Frankenstein creating a human when that is intended to be a job only of God parallels with the researchers of stem cells. This type of research has heightened extensive controversy in the aspects of religion. Each religion seems to have a particular opinion of stem cell research. For example, the majority of Christians supports adult stem cell research but opposes embryonic stem cell research since it can potentially create and or destroy human embryos. In the Ten Commandments, it is stated that “Thou shalt not kill,” which directly opposes what stem-cell research performs, and “Thou shalt not have strange gods before Me,” however; the implication of a scientist

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