The Role Of Self-Perception In Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire

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Throughout an individual’s life they encounter hardships and promising events. In addition each event, whether good or bad, has the potential to present new knowledge for future use. Consequently, not all individuals share this view. When staring reality dead in the eye, some individuals may choose to avoid the truth, and instead pursue a method of avoidance. This process is easy, however deludes the individual from admitting reality. Their self-perception emphasizes their good qualities, while simultaneously ignoring the bad ones. Thereby, they morph their reality with illusion to create an environment they can cope with and lead them to a sense of security and happiness. Nonetheless, these perceptions are justified from the sheer delusion …show more content…
I don’t understand what happened to Belle Reve but you don’t know how ridiculous you are being when you suggest that my sister or I or anyone of our family could have perpetrated a swindle on anyone else.” (Scene II, ll. 8 – 13). She is extremely defensive of her sister, and accepts the reality that her childhood home is lost. After, there is a rapid shift in her acceptance of reality. When Stanley hits her, Stella is traumatized; “I want to go away, I want to go away!” (Scene III, ll. 7). Emotionally distressed she and Blanche run to the upstairs room while Stanley cools down. Disappointingly, only after Stanley calls her name, Stella returns embracing Stanley lovingly. This is the primary instance where Stella has chosen to refuse the truth that her husband is a brute and allows her reality to be blinded by love and yearning for family. Additionally, near the end of the play after Stanley has raped Blanche, Stella’s decision to delude herself is heightened. For the safety of her newborn child, she dismisses Blanche’s claims and selects to institutionalize Blanche for her statements against Stanley. “I couldn’t believe her story and go on living with Stanley.” (Scene XI). Dishonestly, Stella admittedly overlooks the possibility that Stanley raped her sister, and values the future of her family – despite the fact that Stanley is abusive and a rapist. Evolving from an honest

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