Pathogens: A Cause Of Infectious Disease

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“You can find bacteria everywhere. They 're invisible to us. I 've never seen a bacterium, except under a microscope. They 're so small, we don 't see them, but they are everywhere” (Bonnie Bassler). Pathogens can be found all around us. Over 160,000 people die each year in the United States from infectious diseases that Pathogens cause. Pathogens can be traced from decades ago even during the geologic time. Many pathogenic organisms show ancestral traces in the fossil records from hundreds of years ago. These pathogens never died and still live on. They grew stronger and now are transmitted in multiple ways. Pathogen transmission involves three steps: escape from the host, travel to, and infection of the new host. There are different ways …show more content…
The docs who were treating her used one drug after another. When resistance arose, they tried another. Finally, they just ran out of drugs" (par.1). This means that pathogens over time have gotten used to simple vaccines that were once able to kill pathogens. These pathogens have gotten so strong and resistant they have become unable to treat. This is dangerous to human society because without the vaccines these dangerous pathogens can live on in people 's body and eventually kill them. In the article, “Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria”, by the Department Of Health And Human Services, states “Antibiotic resistant bacteria are bacteria that are not controlled or killed by antibiotics. They are able to survive and even multiply in the presence of an antibiotic. Most infection-causing bacteria can become resistant to at least some antibiotics” (par 2). This shows that pathogens have become so immune to vaccines that it does not affect them negatively but positively. Pathogens truly are dangerous to human society because these so called antibiotics that were once able to help people get better actually make it worse now and create more bad pathogens in the body. In the article “Antimicrobial Resistance”, by Center Of Disease Control states“Antibiotics and similar drugs, together called antimicrobial agents, have been used for the last 70 years to treat patients who have infectious diseases. Since the 1940s, these drugs have greatly reduced illness and death from infectious diseases. However, these drugs have been used so widely and for so long that the infectious organisms the antibiotics are designed to kill have adapted to them, making the drugs less effective” (par.1). This

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