The Importance Of Memory And Personal Identity

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Memory and personal identity are an integral part of our lives. These characteristics and traits assist us in the way we make decisions and approach situations. Memory in relation to personal identity is a topic that has been studied by several Philosophers. The question of whether or not memory presupposes identity is a circular one, and therefore makes this question important. To study this, I looked at Parfits theory of Psychological continuity, and how it was seen as problematic due to its circularity. Parfits solution to the circular objection was quasi-memory, however Schechtman holds criticism against quasi-memory due to its easy misinterpretation.
In relation to identity, many people composed their own beliefs involving personal identity
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A madman can mistakenly think that he can remember leading the French troops at the battle of Waterloo – those memory-like experiences cannot be genuine memories. Only Napoleon could genuinely remember leading the French troops into battle. (Beebee and Dodd, P. 11)

This passage is an example of the circular objection theory transpiring. The theory does not intend to falsify other theories, however in order to figure out if person A and person B are the ‘same person’, we are depending on the true (facts) memories and experiences of both individuals (Beebee and Dodd, P. 11). If Paul claims to be the famous actor Tom Hanks, we are not able to say whether or not this memory is true as we cannot internalize another person’s memory (Beebee and Dodd, P.
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Since q-memories are now being passed along during the process of Psychological continuity, both apparent and real memories are being used. “An apparent memory might be a real memory – you might be recalling an experience that you originally had. Or it might not be: it might have been implanted, and somebody else originally had the experience” (Beebee and Dodd, P. 34). Now that we are applying q-memory, Person B and C can depend on the q-memories they are given. With memory we were not able to internalize the memories of other individuals, yet with q-memory we are able to share and interpret memories and experiences of

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