The Importance Of Indigenous Education In Australia

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Education is an important aspect of a child’s life; it is what creates their future. Narrowing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous is important, as it enables Indigenous students the opportunity at a brighter future. Through statistics, Indigenous students are behind in attendance and National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). The Australian Government has produced documents that outline areas where Indigenous students are falling behind, ways in which the Government aims to increase Indigenous students’ academic achievement. The National Curriculum includes cross-curriculum priorities known as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Histories and Cultures, which enables Indigenous students to see themselves, their identities and their cultures building their self-esteem and participate in their learning (ACARA, 2016). Narrowing the gap for Indigenous students requires students to attend mainstream schooling, which may involve moving due to living in rural communities. Moving out of their Indigenous communities may be seen as losing their cultural identity and respect. It is important for Indigenous students to attend school, as it enables individuals to develop the knowledge, understanding, and skills required in the 21st century. The …show more content…
However, it is clearly evident that there is a gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. It is important that as a nation, the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students becomes smaller. The Australian Government believes that all Australians are entitled to and should receive a world-class education, no matter their religion or family background (2013, p.56). Involving and encouraging all students to attend school, to actively participate in their learning, enabling an equal and supportive environment will encourage all students in Australia and narrowing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous

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