The Importance Of Globalization In Living Religions

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Religion is a method for people to express their beliefs freely. It allows people to communicate with each other, practice their spiritual beliefs, rituals, and social practices. Moreover, these practices are being impaired specifically to Indigenous peoples. In the book Living Religions by, Mary Pat Fisher; she explains Globalization process, and how it is becoming a complication to Indigenous people; and how development projects aroused issues with indigenous people’s land.
Indigenous signifies “native to a place”, and globalization is essentially disrupting indigenous people who are trying to preserve their land, and their ancestor’s heritage. Fisher states that “Many people are seeing the land they are supposed to be caretakers of taken
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Seeing that, the spread of globalization is ruining indigenous people daily lives because nonnative people are contaminating the land, and aren’t appreciating indigenous people custom. As the globalization process continues, the circumstances worsen. Fisher explains “the American founder of the boarding-school system for native children took them away from their families at a young age and transformed their identity, presenting the native ways as inferior and distancing. . . traditional sacred life” (Fisher 59). Not only, globalization is ravaging indigenous people culture, and degrading their practices; but Americans are implementing their boarding school system, and are apprehending Indigenous children away from their families. The children that were taken away, are then brainwashed into thinking that their native roots are inferior; and making them digest a new religion. Even more, the globalization movement continued to evoke sinister intention, Fisher states “acculturation was conducted between the 1880s and 1960s with Australian Aboriginal children. Taken away from their parents by force, the …show more content…
Two indigenous groups that were greatly affected by this were Navajos and Hopis. Fisher states “Navajos and Hopis were living were found to be sitting on the largest coal deposit in the country. . . Since then the sacred land has been devastated, ancient archaeological and burial sites have been destroyed, thousands of Navajos have been displaced, surface ground water have been contaminated” (Fisher 63). As a result, the mining company destroyed sacred land that Navajos and Hopis preserved. More importantly, it made Navajos homeless, and contaminated drinking water that was available to Navajos. Henceforth, this project led to numerous number of people homeless, and drinking water was scares due to contamination. Not only, but also these development projects were corrupted by the American government, Fisher states “It is now thought that the government-established tribal councils—themselves not considered genuine representatives of the tribal people—were being advised by an attorney who was secretly employed by the coal company” (Fisher 63). With this intention, indigenous people were at an unfair advantage because the American government were being immoral, and tricked indigenous people to allow the coal mining company vandalize their sacred land. For this reason, indigenous people had to confront this issue, and start pressing legal allegation upon

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