Free Will In Kate Chopin's Story Of An Hour

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Happiness is not easy to achieve; just like many wonderful, blissful feelings, the best of them are never easily come by. When we are young, we allow ourselves to enjoy the simplicity that life has to offer. It was carefree. However, as adults, to be truly happy, it’s laudable. Society and psychological human desire impedes us to achieve satisfaction, but it’s embedded within us to struggle. This same struggle to achieve happiness is only attainable, as portrayed in literature and films, through free will. The lack of free will is what leads to dissatisfaction. We eventually crack from unhappiness without free will, and if unbroken, we pretend to are happy as we conform to society’s well-constructed face. Mrs. Mallard, from the short story, …show more content…
Mallard the opportunity to live a happy life without compromise. This specific event is when she learns that her husband has supposedly dead. Marked as a significant moment, Mrs. Mallard, unlike most women who have a “paralyzed inability to accept” (1) the death, quickly acknowledged it and grieved for a bit, until she realizes what her widowed status meant freedom. For her, it meant “she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers… believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow creature” (2). Her reaction is as if she has been waiting forever for this moment, and although her moment came in the most unfortunate circumstances, her “body and soul [were] free” (2). Shifting the focus from Mrs. Mallard’s character to her circumstances, society believes that she is in grief, not relief. Ironically, when she dies at the sight of her husband, the doctors confirm that it was caused by “joy that kills”, when it was from disappointment. This situation tells us a lot about the pressure that Mrs. Mallard receives from society to be the perfect wife. Despite, Mrs. Mallard soaking in her new life, disliked having to fulfill her womanly “duties” for the sake of tradition and wanted her own

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