The Importance Of Cultural Identity In America

1426 Words 6 Pages
Will the United States ever have the ability to create a true American cultural identity where any and all groups of people would perfectly fit in? American culture identity has been a problem in the United States for many centuries. People’s cultural identity has been a problem since the United States of America were established. Like the founding fathers who fought in the Revolutionary War, many others have fought long and deadly battles for the right to preserve their cultural identity. A person’s cultural identity allows them to feel a sense of belonging, acceptance, and the ability to identify themselves with each other. Many problems will continue to arise in a country that was and continues to be established by many different groups …show more content…
It may not make sense to many but it is understandable why many Mexicans, whose families were separated by the Rio Grande when the U.S. took Mexico’s land, continue to believe that the United States is still part of Mexico. Many immigrants fail to accept the American culture because the U.S is so diverse they do not feel the need to assimilate. Gary M. Segura and Luis R. Fraga in “Culture Clash” state, “If Mexican immigration is to be feared for both its volume and its ongoing nature, which allegedly presents a challenge to national identity, it is urgent then that we pay due attention to its causes” (284). Mexican have for the most part always been a target of political debate. Many people believe immigrants are a threat to the United States, yet they are willing to hire immigrants to do jobs others are not willing to do. If the government wants immigrants to assimilate to the American identity and American ways they need to start funding additional programs to teach them English. The government should also allow them to have a better future through education. Frag and Segura …show more content…
The United States was a nation developed by several groups of people who had been persecuted from their country. Tired of a monarchy government they fled in search of a better life where they would have the ability to practice their religion freely. Eric Foner in Give Me Liberty! states, “like so many other immigrant to America, Puritans came in search of liberty, especially the right to worship and govern themselves in what they deemed a truly Christian manner” (65). Since early colonial life the American cultural identity was beginning to develop. Federalist and Anti-Federalist were tired of the British monarchy and wanted to develop a government that worked for all people living in within the colonies. The Federalist wanted a strong central government that granted the federal government more power over the states. Anti-Federalist; however, opposed the idea of creating another monarchy and did not agree the federal government should have control over states. Anti-Federalist did not want to re-create the same type of government they were trying break ties off. Barbara A. Bardes, Mack C. Shelley II, and Steffen W. Schmidt in American Government and Politis Today state, “the Declaration of Independence set forth ideals that have since become a fundamental part of our national identity” (27). The Declaration of Independence opened with “We the people” including

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